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LDRA Adds ISO 26262:2018 Training to LDRA tool suite for Automotive

Training and support for the new functional safety standard to be key components of LDRA’s automotive offering

Wirral, U.K. – 5 March 2019 – LDRA, the leader in standards compliance, automated software verification, software code analysis, and test tools, today announced the addition of training in the ISO 26262:2018 functional safety standard to its growing education portfolio. The new courses complement existing courses in the MISRA language subsets, consultancy services relating to the application of ISO 26262 and SAE J3061, and the LDRA tool suite for Automotive.

LDRA’s global offering of ISO 26262:2018 courses follows the success of similar courses in India. Still under development, the subject matter covered in these LDRA courses could range from a software-specific focus on Part 6 to the full scope of the standard. ISO 26262 recommends the use of the MISRA language subsets, and LDRA’s in-house MISRA expertise will complement that element of the courses. To finalize the details, LDRA is actively seeking feedback on the needs of the automotive safety- and security-critical development community.

LDRA’s long-time commitment to support the international development, adoption, and enforcement of rigorous software standards that ensure the safety and security of software-based electronics systems makes the company an ideal provider of such courses. LDRA’s support for industry safety standards includes representation on the committee responsible for ISO 26262:2018 with LDRA technical specialist Andrew Banks. LDRA is also represented on learned committees across the world including several DO-178C subgroups, BSI committees, and the secureC, MISRA C, and MISRA C++ language subset committees. Such experience informs the development of tools and the provision of consulting services at LDRA and, more recently, the company’s emergence and growing reputation as a training provider.

Ian Hennell, Operations Director, LDRA, explained the thinking behind the courses. “LDRA has been an established software tool provider for more than 45 years,” said Hennell. “We have always supported our tools with the provision of related training, and more recently complemented that by sharing our MISRA C:2012 expertise with the development community through our training courses. We look forward to extending these offerings through the addition of ISO 26262:2018 courses.“

About LDRA

For more than 40 years, LDRA has developed and driven the market for software that automates code analysis and software testing for safety-, mission-, security-, and business-critical markets. Working with clients to achieve early error identification and full compliance with industry standards, LDRA traces requirements through static and dynamic analysis to unit testing and verification for a wide variety of hardware and software platforms. Boasting a worldwide presence, LDRA is headquartered in the United Kingdom with subsidiaries in the United States, Germany, and India coupled with an extensive distributor network. For more information on the LDRA tool suite, please visit www.ldra.com.

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