Computers
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Blockchain is not Bitcoin—Bitcoin is not Blockchain

EEJournal readers ought to be very familiar with Bitcoin by now. All of the computing fruits of semiconductor technology, including microprocessors, GPUs, FPGAs, and ultimately ASICs, have been harnessed in the frenzied search for solutions to a mathematical problem that serves as “proof of work” that entitles the bearer to Bitcoin, using the rules originally created by the pseudonymous Satoshi Nakamoto and published in a paper … Read More → "Blockchain is not Bitcoin—Bitcoin is not Blockchain"

Did Nantero Just Slam the Coffin Lid on DRAMs?

Intel finally succeeded in making a workable DRAM, the 1103, in 1970, and by 1972, magnetic-core memory was on its way out after a 20-year reign as the only memory of choice for mainframes and minicomputers. Compared to DRAM, core memory was slow and expensive. Access times were on the order of microseconds, and attempts to automate core-plane production met with very limited success. They remained hand-woven until the … Read More → "Did Nantero Just Slam the Coffin Lid on DRAMs?"

Birth of the AI Machine

The dawn of artificial intelligence has ironically coincided with the dusk of Moore’s Law. Just as our collective engineering genius begins to wane on the task of exponential improvements in the performance and efficiency of von Neumann processors, those processors reach a point where they can do a rudimentary job on artificial intelligence applications. Apparently something in the cosmos either has a sinister … Read More → "Birth of the AI Machine"

RISC-V Aims for World Domination

“One day you wake up and realize the world can be conquered…” – Austin Grossman

Dr. David Patterson, the newest recipient of the ACM’s A.M. Turing Award along with John Hennessy, launched into his opening remarks during his talk about the past, present, and future of processor and ISA (instruction set architecture) design at the annual dinner meeting of the < … Read More → "RISC-V Aims for World Domination"

Intel Acquires eASIC – Why?

Intel announced last week that they are acquiring structured ASIC company eASIC into their Programmable Systems Group (PSG). If you haven’t been following along in your major merger primer, Intel PSG was formerly known as Altera – one of the two major players in the FPGA market. Altera has played second fiddle to Xilinx in the Duopoly Symphony for the past twenty seasons or so. This … Read More → "Intel Acquires eASIC – Why?"

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featured blogs
Sep 21, 2018
On Labor day, I didn't get the day off since I was in Delhi. I had to labor, not celebrate it by eating barbecue. Instead, I ate chicken curry, naan, and fried okra at the lunch I had with Jaswinder Ahuja in a conference room. I knew he had just passed his 30-year annive...
Sep 20, 2018
When many modern high-tech weapons were developed, such as nuclear weapon systems, computer capabilities were a fraction of what they are now. Few could have predicted the strides that......
Sep 18, 2018
Samtec performs several tests in-house as part of our qualification testing on a product series; including Low Level Contact Resistance (LLCR). It measures the amount of resistance in a position on a part. LLCR is used in combination with several other tests to track the over...
Sep 9, 2018
  The lease listing on the Pacific American Group'€™s Web site reads: '€œEight Forty Four East Charleston Road is a historically relevant commercial building in Palo Alto. This building was key in the development of Silicon Valley'€™s computer business. Here, Rober...
chalk talks
Mid-Board Optics: An Alternative to Pluggable MSA Solutions How would you like to upgrade from copper to optical flyover – all with the same connector system? In this episode of Chalk Talk, Amelia Dalton chats with Matthew Burns from Samtec about Firefly – a future-proof high-density flyover system. Click here to download the Firefly Application Design Guide