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Veridae Proliferates

Last fall we took a look at Veridae’s Clarus debug tool. At the time, it was positioned to handle SoCs and FPGAs, including multi-FPGA prototype boards.

So when they announced their Corus product at ESC, intended to cover FPGAs, I was confused. To be clear, I’m often confused, and I figured it was just me. But in talking more with Veridae, I found this to be one time when my brain wasn’t taking unpaid time off.

Having spent a lot of years marketing technology, I know from personal experience that’s it’s all too easy to do just that: market technology. And, when you’re a new company, you start talking to prospects and realize that different users have different needs that could be served by what is one technology foundation. So rather than marketing one product that reflects the technology, you end up dividing the job up, crafting different solutions for the different needs, even if they share a lot of code.

Well, that’s what happened with Veridae. The Clarus brief has been reduced: it is now positioned for SoC post-silicon debug. And the new Corus product focuses on FPGAs.

More details in their press release

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