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DDC-I and Vector Software Announce Availability of VectorCAST Test Automation Platform for Deos DO-178 Safety-Critical RTOS

Speeds time to market for developing, testing, and certifying C/C++ and Ada software for DO-178 safety-critical applications

Phoenix, AZ and Providence, RI USA – August 22, 2017.  DDC-I, a leading supplier of software and professional services for mission- and safety-critical applications, and Vector Software, a leading provider of automated software testing solutions for safety- and business-critical embedded applications, today announced the availability of the VectorCAST test automation platform for DDC-I’s Deos™ safety-critical real-time operating system and OpenArbor™ integrated development environment. The integrated platform greatly reduces the time and cost associated with developing, testing, and certifying DO-178 safety-critical application software.

“We’re excited to be working with Vector to offer their world-class test automation tools for our safety-critical RTOS,” said Greg Rose, vice president of marketing and product management at DDC-I. “The integration of our RTOS and tools with Vector’s test automation suite addresses all aspects of development, test and certification for DO-178 safety-critical applications.”

”We are pleased to support DDC-I’s Deos RTOS with the VectorCAST test automation platform,” said Jeffrey Fortin, head of product management for Vector Software. “The integration, along with both companies’ DO-178 expertise, provides customers with a complete solution for a more efficient certification process.”

VectorCAST is a dynamic software test solution that automates C/C++ and Ada unit and integration testing, which is necessary for validating safety- and mission-critical embedded systems. VectorCAST automates the creation of stubs and drivers as part of the creation of the test harness, normally a manual process, giving developers time to focus on building thorough, high-quality test cases. With VectorCAST, unit testing can be done natively or on a specific target or simulator. The VectorCAST Runtime Support Package (RSP) provides a full-featured integration that allows for download, execution and results capture using the built-in networking facilities of the Deo’s RTOS.

Deos is a safety-critical embedded RTOS that has been certified to DO-178 DAL A since 1998. Featuring deterministic real-time response, the time- and space- partitioned RTOS employs patented slack scheduling to deliver higher CPU utilization than any other certifiable safety-critical COTS RTOS. Deos is built from the ground up for safety-critical applications, and is the only certifiable time- and space-partitioned COTS RTOS that has been created using RTCA DO-178, Level A processes from the very first day of its product development. Deos provides the easiest, lowest cost path of any COTS RTOS to DO-178 Level A certification, the highest level of safety criticality.

Development support for Deos includes DDC-I’s Eclipse-based, mixed-language OpenArbor IDE, which features Ada, C and C++ optimizing compilers, a color-coded source editor, project management support, automated build utilities, and a symbolic debugger. Also included is a virtual target hardware development tool, QEMU (Quick EMUlator), which allows developers to develop, debug and test their code on their development host PC in advance of actual target hardware availability.

About Vector Software

Vector Software is the world’s leading provider of software testing solutions for safety and business critical embedded applications. Companies worldwide in the automotive, aerospace, medical devices, industrial controls, rail, and other business critical sectors rely on Vector Software’s VectorCAST® test automation platform. The VectorCAST environment enables software development teams to easily automate complex testing tasks to improve software quality, using Test-Driven Development, Continuous Integration, and Change-Based Testing processes to engineer reliable software for accelerated time-to-market release cycles. Vector Software is headquartered in East Greenwich, Rhode Island USA with offices worldwide, and a world-class team of support and technology partners. To learn more, visit: vectorcast.com or follow Vector Software on FacebookGoogle+LinkedInTwitter, and YouTube.

About DDC-I, Inc.
DDC-I, Inc. is a global supplier of real-time operating systems, software development tools, custom software development services, and legacy software system modernization solutions, with a primary focus on mission- and safety-critical applications. DDC-I’s customer base is an impressive “who’s who” in the commercial, military, aerospace, and safety-critical industries. DDC-I offers safety-critical real-time operating systems, compilers, integrated development environments and run-time systems for C, C++, Ada, and JOVIAL application development. For more information regarding DDC-I products, contact DDC-I at 4600 E. Shea Blvd, Phoenix, AZ 85028; phone (602) 275-7172; fax (602) 252-6054; e-mail sales@ddci.com or visit http://www.ddci.com/pr1707.

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