fresh bytes
Subscribe Now

Drones will watch Australian beaches for sharks with AI help

Humans aren’t particularly good at spotting sharks using aerial data. At best, they’ll accurately pinpoint sharks 30 percent of the time — not very helpful for swimmers worried about stepping into the water. Australia, however, is about to get a more reliable way of spotting these undersea predators. As of September, Little Ripper drones will monitor some Australian beaches for signs of sharks, and pass along their imagery to an AI system that can identify sharks in real-time with 90 percent accuracy. Humans will still run the software (someone has to verify the results), but this highly automated system could be quick and reliable enough to save lives.

Continue reading at Engadget

Image: Alan Menzies via Getty Images

Leave a Reply

featured blogs
Mar 23, 2018
Up to this point, my blogs have been focused on the fluid flow aspects of  CFD simulation, but since thermal effects can have a significant impact on flow as the fluid properties are affected by the temperature change, I will now start to look at some of the heat transfer as...
Mar 23, 2018
It was SEMICON China last week, and I've written a couple of posts about it this week. Talking about semiconductor manufacturing equipment a lot recently reminded me of a friend who used to work in the semiconductor equipment industry (and I did some consulting for him y...
Mar 22, 2018
Samtec’s RF product and service offering continues to grow.  Here’s a quick overview of the major developments: Expanded Bulls Eye® Offering:  Bulls Eye high-performance test point systems are now available in 50 GHz and 20 GHz designs, with systems up to 65 GH...
Mar 5, 2018
Next-generation networking solutions are pushing processing out of the cloud and towards the network'€™s edge. At the same time, processing structures architected around programmable logic provide the ability to make computing much more data-centric. Programmable logic make...