feature article
Subscribe Now

Spectre and Meltdown Continuing Coverage

Latest from EE Journal

Spectre and Meltdown are possibly the most important (and interesting) security vulnerabilities discovered in the past two decades. Because they capitalize on weaknesses in commonly-used architectural features in many processors, they span numerous vendors, processors, and just about every type of computing device. Billions of processors deployed over the past two decades could be vulnerable.

The EE Journal editorial team is working to bring you the “engineer’s view” of Spectre and Meltdown – from the technical details of the vulnerabilities – to the popular misconceptions – to the blatant attempts to profiteer and incite panic.

Jim Turley led off with a great exploration of the mechanics of the Spectre and Meltdown attacks as they relate to processor architectures:

Hardware Bugs Afflict Nearly All CPUs

Kevin Morris followed with an opinion piece on the panic wave that followed the disclosure of the vulnerabilities:

Spectre and Meltdown and iPhone Batteries and Henny Penny

High-security companies such as Microsemi quickly reacted with press releases claiming their products were immune:

Microsemi Announces its Entire Product Portfolio is Unaffected by Spectre and Meltdown Vulnerabilities

Kevin Morris followed with a look at how other companies (such as Office Depot) are exploiting the vulnerabilities for profit, and fueling the fire of panic in the process.

Profiteering from Spectre and Meltdown

Continue to follow our coverage on EEJournal.com

The official Spectre/Meltdown site:

https://meltdownattack.com/

Leave a Reply

featured blogs
Aug 17, 2018
Samtec’s growing portfolio of high-performance Silicon-to-Silicon'„¢ Applications Solutions answer the design challenges of routing 56 Gbps signals through a system. However, finding the ideal solution in a single-click probably is an obstacle. Samtec last updated the...
Aug 17, 2018
If you read my post Who Put the Silicon in Silicon Valley? then you know my conclusion: Let's go with Shockley. He invented the transistor, came here, hired a bunch of young PhDs, and sent them out (by accident, not design) to create the companies, that created the compa...
Aug 16, 2018
All of the little details were squared up when the check-plots came out for "final" review. Those same preliminary files were shared with the fab and assembly units and, of course, the vendors have c...
Aug 14, 2018
I worked at HP in Ft. Collins, Colorado back in the 1970s. It was a heady experience. We were designing and building early, pre-PC desktop computers and we owned the market back then. The division I worked for eventually migrated to 32-bit workstations, chased from the deskto...
Jul 30, 2018
As discussed in part 1 of this blog post, each instance of an Achronix Speedcore eFPGA in your ASIC or SoC design must be configured after the system powers up because Speedcore eFPGAs employ nonvolatile SRAM technology to store its configuration bits. The time required to pr...