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u-blox adds superior integrated PCB antenna option to the NINA-B3 series of Bluetooth low energy modules

Thalwil, Switzerland – February 7, 2019 – u-blox (SIX:UBXN), a global provider of leading positioning and wireless communication technologies, announced that its popular NINA-B3 (https://www.u-blox.com/en/product/nina-b3-series) series of stand-alone Bluetooth® 5 low energy modules now includes the NINA-B306/316 modules with integrated PCB antenna. The trapezoidal printed antenna, technology licensed from Proant AB, enable superior performance transmission and reception of data in a small form factor.

Bluetooth low energy is rapidly becoming the short-range wireless technology of choice for a broad range of IoT applications, thanks to its security and robustness, coupled with higher data rates, longer range, support for mesh networking and exceptionally low power demands. By moving the antenna to the PCB, manufacturers can now implement the NINA-B3 family into even smaller form factors.

“The introduction of Bluetooth 5 makes the technology even more applicable to a range of IoT applications,” said Pelle Svensson, Market Development Manager, Product Center Short Range Radio at u‑blox. “The NINA-B306/316 modules, with their fully integrated PCB antenna and global certification, make implementing this powerful technology even easier.”

The NINA-B306/316 modules are fully pin and software compatible with the entire NINA series, giving manufacturers a seamless upgrade path as well as design options. Depending on the end application it may be more appropriate to use an external antenna, while for many a PCB antenna will offer technical and commercial benefits. With its small form factor measuring 10x15x2.2 mm, the NINA-B306/316 modules offer u-blox customers a greater design freedom.

NINA-B306/316 samples are available and production is planned for March 2019.

About u‑blox
u‑blox (SIX:UBXN) is a global provider of leading positioning and wireless communication technologies for the automotive, industrial, and consumer markets. Their solutions let people, vehicles, and machines determine their precise position and communicate wirelessly over cellular and short-range networks. With a broad portfolio of chips, modules, and a growing ecosystem of product supporting data services, u-blox is uniquely positioned to empower its customers to develop innovative solutions for the Internet of Things, quickly and cost-effectively. With headquarters in Thalwil, Switzerland, the company is globally present with offices in Europe, Asia, and the USA.

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