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Non-Isolated Buck Switchers from Diodes Incorporated Provide High Voltage AC-DC Conversion with Low Standby Current for Always-On Appliances

Plano, Texas – August 14, 2019 – Diodes Incorporated (Nasdaq: DIOD) today announced the AP3917 family of universal AC-DC, non-isolated buck (step-down) power switchers for low-power applications, such as small appliances and IoT endpoints powered by an offline supply. Family members include the AP3917B (170mA nominal load), AP3917C (270mA), and AP3917D (370mA).

The need for direct, non-isolated AC-DC conversion in a small form factor, with high levels of efficiency and low standby current, is increasing due to the proliferation of small household, office, and industrial appliances that operate as standalone devices or as part of the IoT.

The AP3917 family of buck switchers is designed to provide highly efficient, offline power conversion for light-load applications. Discontinuous and continuous conduction modes are both supported.

The AP3917 buck switcher can convert a full-wave rectified, AC input voltage between 85VAC and 265VAC to a nominal 8.0V DC output. Its non-isolated design requires no external transformer and very few external components, saving space and BoM cost.

 

With a no-load power consumption of less than 30mW, the AP3917 buck switchers are particularly suitable for small appliances that operate in standby mode for prolonged periods when connected to an AC outlet. Its low-power credentials and small solution size also make the AP3917 appropriate for IoT devices that are always connected but not always active.

 

Supplied in a surface-mount SO-7 package, the AP3917BS7-13 is available priced at $0.22 in 4000 piece quantities.

Further information is available at www.diodes.com
About Diodes Incorporated
Diodes Incorporated (Nasdaq: DIOD), a Standard and Poor’s SmallCap 600 and Russell 3000 Index company, is a leading global manufacturer and supplier of high-quality application specific standard products within the broad discrete, logic, analog, and mixed-signal semiconductor markets. Diodes serves the consumer electronics, computing, communications, industrial, and automotive markets. Diodes’ products include diodes, rectifiers, transistors, MOSFETs, protection devices, function-specific arrays, single gate logic, amplifiers and comparators, Hall-effect and temperature sensors, power management devices, including LED drivers, AC-DC converters and controllers, DC-DC switching and linear voltage regulators, and voltage references along with special function devices, such as USB power switches, load switches, voltage supervisors, and motor controllers. Diodes also has timing, connectivity, switching, and signal integrity solutions for high-speed signals. Diodes’ corporate headquarters and Americas’ sales office are located in Plano, Texas and Milpitas, California. Design, marketing, and engineering centers are located in Plano; Milpitas; Taipei, Taiwan; Taoyuan City, Taiwan; Zhubei City, Taiwan; Manchester, UK; and Neuhaus, Germany. Diodes’ wafer fabrication facilities are located in Manchester and Greenock, UK, and Shanghai, China. Diodes has assembly and test facilities located in Shanghai, Jinan, Chengdu, and Yangzhou, China, as well as in Hong Kong, Neuhaus, and Taipei. Additional engineering, sales, warehouse, and logistics offices are located in Taipei; Hong Kong; Manchester; Shanghai; Shenzhen, China; Seongnam-si, South Korea; Munich, Germany; and Tokyo, Japan, with support offices throughout the world.

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