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Light based 3D printer shapes custom objects from liquid resin

Hayden Taylor, assistant professor of mechanical engineering at the University of California, Berkeley, and senior author of a paper on the technology explained that the printer relies on a viscous liquid that reacts to form a solid when exposed to a certain threshold of light. Projecting carefully crafted patterns of light – essentially “movies” – onto a rotating cylinder of liquid solidifies the desired shape “all at once.” [Source]

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