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$600 Shoelace-tying robot was built on a shoestring budget

With a budget of just $600—a mere pittance compared to what robots like ATLAS cost to develop—students from the University of California’s Davis’ College of Engineering created a machine that’s capable of tying a shoe all by itself.

After mastering the skill when you’re five years old, you probably don’t give much thought to the intricate ballet of fingers and laces that’s performed every time you tie your shoes. But in reality, it’s a complicated process. What makes these engineering student’s machine even more impressive is that it’s powered by just two motors, and relies on a series of gears and moving rods to pick up and move a pair of shoelaces around. Read more at Gizmodo

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Using the DS28E18, The Basics

Sponsored by Maxim Integrated

This application note goes over the basics of using the DS28E18 1-Wire® to I2C/SPI Bridge with Command Sequencer and discusses the steps to get it up and running quickly. It then shows how to use the device with two different devices. The first device is an I2C humidity/temperature sensor and the second one is an SPI temperature sensor device. It concludes with detailed logs of each command.

Click here to download the whitepaper

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Minitek Microspace

Sponsored by Mouser Electronics and Amphenol ICC

With the incredible pace of automotive innovation these days, it’s important to choose the right connectors for the job. With everything from high-speed data to lighting, connectors have a huge impact on reliability, cost, and design. In this episode of Chalk Talk, Amelia Dalton chats with Glenn Heath from Amphenol ICC about the Minitek MicroSpace line of automotive- and industrial-grade connectors.

Click here for more information about Amphenol FCI Minitek MicroSpace™ Connector System