fish fry
Subscribe Now

Building a Better Bridge To Tomorrow

Multi-core, Microservers and NASA’s Open Source Summit

In my Fish Fry this week, I debate the nature of multi-core and examine some new standards that will hopefully make multi-core implementation easier in the future. I also dig into the newest Intel/ARM battle in the world of servers, investigate some fuzzy TSA math and look forward to the first annual NASA Open Source Summit. Also this week, I offer up a new way to create energy (coming to a pond near you) and serve up a brand new nerdy giveaway.

If you like the idea of this new series, be sure to drop a comment in the box below. I appreciate all of your comments so far, and we will be working to enhance the Fish Fry each week – as long as you’re watching.


 

Watch Previous Fish Frys

Fish Fry Links – March 18, 2011

Bryon Moyer’s article: What’s Yours Is Mine – MRAPI Lets You Manage Embedded Resources

Dick Selwood’s article: Fair Trading

Intel and SeaMicro collaboration

More Information on SeaMicro

TSA Math Error

NASA’s Open Source Summit

Duckweed used as fuel

Microchip Technology’s PICkit 3 Debug Express

Leave a Reply

featured blogs
Sep 20, 2018
At this year's HOT CHIPS, Jeff Rupley of Samsung presented the application processor that goes in their Galaxy S9 and S9+ smartphones. Apple only ever gives cursory information about their Ax chips, and I don't remember seeing a lot of detail about the HiSilicon chi...
Sep 18, 2018
Samtec performs several tests in-house as part of our qualification testing on a product series; including Low Level Contact Resistance (LLCR). It measures the amount of resistance in a position on a part. LLCR is used in combination with several other tests to track the over...
Sep 11, 2018
Printed-circuit board (PCB) complexity mandates performing different analysis types to ensure robust board performance. This complexity is brought on by the ever-increasing ......
Sep 9, 2018
  The lease listing on the Pacific American Group'€™s Web site reads: '€œEight Forty Four East Charleston Road is a historically relevant commercial building in Palo Alto. This building was key in the development of Silicon Valley'€™s computer business. Here, Rober...