editor's blog
Subscribe Now

Enabling CSR… or… Microchip?

This was originally going to be simply an update on something we discussed before. But it may be slightly more than that.

You may recall that, when it comes to local wireless for the Internet of Things (IoT), it’s largely a battle between WiFi, Bluetooth, and Zigbee (not counting proprietary networks). And that WiFi and Bluetooth have an edge, being in phones.

But Zigbee, despite its detractors (which seem legion), has one feature that can be useful for extending the range of a network: meshing. It’s something rival Bluetooth can’t do.

That is, until CSR introduced CSRmesh to lay a meshing capability over Bluetooth.

So this was largely going to be an update to say that CSR has also introduced an enablement kit to make it easier to get going. It includes dev boards, a USB programmer, and a software development kit (SDK) that initially targets the lighting market, with others coming later in the year.

CSRmesh_kit_550.jpg

 

Image courtesy CSR

But then came news of a more unusual sort: Microchip is in talks that may result in Microchip’s acquiring CSR. Not that an acquisition like this would be unusual, but, ordinarily, you would hear about it when the deal is done; not when talks start. Heck, you’re practically inviting your competitors to come help drive the price up!

Slightly closer review (OK, not that much closer – just reading boilerplate at the bottom of the release that would ordinarily be ignored) provide clues as to what’s up: we’re not in Kansas anymore. In the gray print at the bottom of their website you’ll find that, “CSR Plc is a company registered in England and Wales.” And the UK has a “Takeover Code” that requires more disclosure than what we’re used to this side of the pond.

So… if you’re engaging with CSR’s technology, it might someday come with a Microchip logo. Then again, it might not.

You can get more info on CSR’s enablement kit in their announcement, [Editos note: updated to fix a press release issue.]

Leave a Reply

featured blogs
Oct 27, 2021
ASIC hardware verification is a complex process; explore key challenges and bug hunting, debug, and SoC verification solutions to satisfy sign-off requirements. The post The Quest for Bugs: The Key Challenges appeared first on From Silicon To Software....
Oct 27, 2021
Cadence was recently ranked #7 on Newsweek's Most Loved Workplaces list for 2021 and #17 on Fortune's World's Best Workplaces list. Cadence received top recognition among thousands of other companies... [[ Click on the title to access the full blog on the Cadence Community s...
Oct 20, 2021
I've seen a lot of things in my time, but I don't think I was ready to see a robot that can walk, fly, ride a skateboard, and balance on a slackline....
Oct 4, 2021
The latest version of Intel® Quartus® Prime software version 21.3 has been released. It introduces many new intuitive features and improvements that make it easier to design with Intel® FPGAs, including the new Intel® Agilex'„¢ FPGAs. These new features and improvements...

featured video

Fast & Accurate 3D Object Detection for LiDAR with DesignWare ARC EV Processor IP

Sponsored by Synopsys

This demo, developed in partnership with Sensor Cortek, executes the FA3D algorithm on ARC EV7x processor with DNN engine. It shows 3D boxes rendered onto objects detected in the video frames, enabling the development of driver assistance systems.

Click here for more information

featured paper

Voltage Balancing Techniques for Series Supercapacitor Connections

Sponsored by Maxim Integrated (now part of Analog Devices)

For applications where supercapacitors need to be charged to more than 2.5V or 2.7V, engineers are forced to connect multiple supercapacitors in a series. This application note reviews the voltage balancing techniques in series supercapacitor connections for Maxim’s MAX38886/MAX38888/MAX38889 backup regulators.

Click to read more

featured chalk talk

In-Chip Sensing and PVT Monitoring

Sponsored by Synopsys

In-chip monitoring can significantly alter the lifecycle management landscape. By taking advantage of modern techniques, today’s more complex designs can be optimized even after they are deployed. In this episode of Chalk Talk, Amelia Dalton chats with Stephen Crosher of Synopsys about silicon lifecycle management and how to take full advantage of the optimization opportunities available for scalability, reliability, and much more.

Click here for more information about in-chip monitoring and sensing