editor's blog
Subscribe Now

Cadence gobbling up IP?

The announcement that Cadence is planning to buy Evatronix marks the company’s fourth acquisition in a matter of months. One slipped under the radar, what Martin Lund of Cadence referred to as “a small team in Canada working on high-speed SerDes.” The purchase of Cosmic Software is waiting for Indian regulatory approval, and the Tensilica acquisition was completed a few days ago.

A few years ago, Cadence buying companies was not news – it was business as normal. Today, is it a return to the old company working practices?  Well – no. The companies that Cadence was buying then were normally small(ish) suppliers of point tools. Today’s targets are IP companies, and join an IP pool established when Cadence bought Denali three years ago.

Synopsys already declares that about a third of its income comes from supplying IP. (Cadence wouldn’t be drawn on its IP sales, either current or projected.) And this ties in with the changing role of the EDA company and its position in the electronics food chain.  It is no longer sufficient for a chip company to provide silicon: with large and complex SoCs the customers want the software stacks for the interfaces, drivers for the OS (and even the OS).  This means that the chip companies need access to good quality IP to create the peripherals and additional material, and the EDA companies intend, as far as possible, to be the place that the designers turn to for this. Which explains Cadence’s acquisition.

What is interesting as well, is that with these companies that presumably have different development processes and design flows are expected to be integrated into an approach that Cadence is calling the “IP factory”, which will supply straight off-the-shelf IP and also create, within certain limits, customised IP for a specific chip builder’s application.

In the past, an EDA start-up would have acquisition as the exit route which would allow investors to get their returns. Today, perhaps, the road is to build IP?

Leave a Reply

featured blogs
Dec 1, 2022
Raspberry Pi are known for providing lost-cost computing around the world. Their computers have been used by schools, small businesses, and even government call centers. One of their missions is to educate children about computers and to help them realize their potential thro...
Nov 30, 2022
By Chris Clark, Senior Manager, Synopsys Automotive Group The post How Software-Defined Vehicles Expand the Automotive Revenue Stream appeared first on From Silicon To Software....
Nov 30, 2022
By Joe Davis Sponsored by France's ElectroniqueS magazine, the Electrons d'Or Award program identifies the most innovative products of the… ...
Nov 18, 2022
This bodacious beauty is better equipped than my car, with 360-degree collision avoidance sensors, party lights, and a backup camera, to name but a few....

featured video

Unique AMS Emulation Technology

Sponsored by Synopsys

Learn about Synopsys' collaboration with DARPA and other partners to develop a one-of-a-kind, high-performance AMS silicon verification capability. Please watch the video interview or read it online.

Read the interview online:

featured paper

Algorithm Verification with FPGAs and ASICs

Sponsored by MathWorks

Developing new FPGA and ASIC designs involves implementing new algorithms, which presents challenges for verification for algorithm developers, hardware designers, and verification engineers. This eBook explores different aspects of hardware design verification and how you can use MATLAB and Simulink to reduce development effort and improve the quality of end products.

Click here to read more

featured chalk talk

Matter & NXP

Sponsored by Mouser Electronics and NXP Semiconductors

Interoperability in our growing Internet of things ecosystem has been a challenge for years. But the new Matter standard is looking to change all of that. It could not only make homes smarter but our design lives easier as well. In this episode of Chalk Talk, Amelia Dalton and Sujata Neidig from NXP examine how Matter will revolutionize IoT by increasing interoperability, simplifying development and providing a comprehensive approach to security and privacy. They also discuss what the roadmap for Matter looks like and how NXP’s Matter reference platforms can help you get started with your next IoT design.

Click here for more information about NXP Semiconductors Development Platforms for Enabling Matter Devices