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Tying Up the Missing Link

Methodics’s ProjectIC platform is intended to help manage large design projects by keeping the numerous different files associated with the design (so-called “views” – the unbranded sort, whose branded counterpart we’ll discuss in a couple days) in sync with each other. These may include RTL source files, schematic views, analysis runs, layout, and other design artifacts. They’re tied to each other by dependencies that Methodics builds.

One thing they haven’t had completely covered is test. They’ve handled analog test, but not digital. This was the motivation of their recent purchase of Missing Link, which, in particular, has a design management infrastructure that includes digital test and regression.

So Methodics will now be building in the dependencies to those artifacts as well. You can find more detail on the companies in their press release.

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