editor's blog
Subscribe Now

Virtualizer and HAPS Shake Hands

Numerous systems tend to get used for verifying SoCs, and, with software now in the picture, the range is extended even further. We’ve talked before about the use of simulation, virtual prototypes, emulation, and prototyping as ways of getting both hardware and software to work, and to work together. Including their unification.

Synopsys recently took a move towards unification by bringing their Virtualizer virtual platform tool and their HAPS prototyping tool closer together. What this is means is that a design can be implemented with some parts in Virtualizer and some in HAPS and the two systems can talk to each other while running.

They actually run the SCE-MI 2 interface (traditionally found in the emulator-to-host connection), running over their UMRBus. This allows transactors to speed the interchange of data.

The architecture is very AMBA-centric; much of their DesignWare catalog relies on AMBA, and AMBA is popular, so this isn’t a big surprise. They’re open to other busses on an “ask us and we’ll consider it” basis.

The actual use of the tools isn’t so integrated. The two sides have separate programs that you run to manage them – there isn’t one unified interface that can talk to both sides. But this is partly due to the fact that they don’t traditionally see one person doing the whole thing. In the early stages, system integrators/architects would use the Virtualizer side and FPGA guys would implement the HAPS side; they would tag-team to get it up and running. Once that’s all done, then software programmers could use it (using computers more moderate than those required for the FPGA-building tools, for instance). So a single console might not have an associated use case.

The design partitioning process is also manual (although they could see the future possibility of tagging a design to automatically build the virtual and FPGA sides). Cross-triggering between the two sides is rudimentary.

This capability will be generally available in August. Why announce when they did? I’m guessing because they couldn’t talk the DAC guys into rescheduling the conference to August…

You can find more info in their release

 

Leave a Reply

featured blogs
Feb 27, 2021
New Edge Rate High Speed Connector Set Is Micro, Rugged Years ago, while hiking the Colorado River Trail in Rocky Mountain National Park with my two sons, the older one found a really nice Swiss Army Knife. By “really nice” I mean it was one of those big knives wi...
Feb 26, 2021
OMG! Three 32-bit processor cores each running at 300 MHz, each with its own floating-point unit (FPU), and each with more memory than you than throw a stick at!...
Feb 26, 2021
In the SPECTRE 20.1 base release, we released Spectre® XDP-HB as part of the new Spectre X-RF simulation technology. Spectre XDP-HB uses a highly distributed multi-machine multi-core simulation... [[ Click on the title to access the full blog on the Cadence Community si...

featured video

Designing your own Processor with ASIP Designer

Sponsored by Synopsys

Designing your own processor is time-consuming and resource intensive, and it used to be limited to a few experts. But Synopsys’ ASIP Designer tool allows you to design your own specialized processor within your deadline and budget. Watch this video to learn more.

Click here for more information

featured paper

Get more from your GaN-based digital power designs with a C2000™ real-time MCU

Sponsored by Texas Instruments

Designers in the power electronics industry need new technologies and methods to increase performance in GaN systems. C2000™ real-time microcontrollers (MCUs) can help address design challenges when developing modern power-conversion systems using GaN technology.

Click here to download the whitepaper

Featured Chalk Talk

Maxim's Himalaya uSLIC Portfolio

Sponsored by Mouser Electronics and Maxim Integrated

With form factors continuing to shrink, most engineers are working hard to reduce the number of discrete components in their designs. Power supplies, in particular, are problematic - often requiring a number of large components. In this episode of Chalk Talk, Amelia Dalton chats with John Woodward of Maxim Integrated about how power modules can save board space, improve performance, and help reliability.

Click here for more information about Maxim Integrated Himalaya uSLIC™ MAXM1546x Step-Down Power Modules