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Magma People and Products

At the time I commented on the announced Synopsys/Magma merger the other day, I had received no comment on the fate of products and people as the companies combine operations. Synopsys’s Yvette Huygen subsequently reminded me that, technically, the two companies have to operate as independent entities until the merger is complete – sometime in calendar Q2 2012. So they’re not supposed to act like it’s a done deal until in fact the deal is done – it could technically fall apart at some point, and, if they’ve jumped the gun, well, that could be awkward.

Meanwhile, Magma’s Phil Bishop, VP Worldwide Marketing, commented on the product side of things, saying that, “All current products will continue to be maintained and enhanced. After the close we will work with all of our mutual stakeholders at Synopsys to get them up to speed our products and their unique differentiation. We will look for ways in which to cross fertilize key development areas to help create greater synergies in core technology areas.”

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