editor's blog
Subscribe Now

Conditioning Sensor Signals

Some time back, ZMDI made an announcement about a sensor conditioner they had released. A couple things gave me cause for pause as I looked it over. First was the description of a one-pass calibration process as being unique. The other was the fact that a major component of the advanced sensors you may see presented at conferences, examples of which we covered in a sensor article series earlier this year, is the associated circuitry required to turn a raw sensor output into a reliable, usable signal. I.e., conditioning the signal on the same chip as the sensor.

So I checked in with ZMDI to get their thoughts on both of these topics.

With respect to calibration, all sensors require it, worldly imperfections being what they are. Calibration involves measuring the response of the sensor and then applying corrections that are stored in the sensor; each unit has to be individually calibrated. The question is how you do it.

Some apparently correct using analog techniques; some, including ZMDI, use digital. Some – most of the analog ones in particular – use a multi-pass calibration process to set all of the various parameters because there may be coupling between them, so you need to set some values before measuring and setting others. So you do one measurement pass to acquire one set of values and set a correction. Then you do another pass and set a different parameter. Etc.

The one-pass approach measures all necessary data in one pass, and then offline software – e.g., in a PC – can calculate all of the corrections and program them into the sensor’s EEPROM. This is inherently a faster process than multi-pass.

As far as integrating the conditioner with the sensor is concerned, ZMDI agrees that, in principle, this can certainly be done and would be “a reasonable and mutually beneficial advancement,” although no ongoing projects at ZMDI were identified. They indicated that the kinds of sensors best suited to a combined solution are, of course, those that involve MEMS processes that integrate nicely with CMOS. Those include, in particular, piezo-electric sensors measuring things like pressure and strain as well as those that measure inertia – vibration and acceleration.

Leave a Reply

featured blogs
Apr 9, 2021
You probably already know what ISO 26262 is. If you don't, then you can find out in several previous posts: "The Safest Train Is One that Never Leaves the Station" History of ISO 26262... [[ Click on the title to access the full blog on the Cadence Community s...
Apr 8, 2021
We all know the widespread havoc that Covid-19 wreaked in 2020. While the electronics industry in general, and connectors in particular, took an initial hit, the industry rebounded in the second half of 2020 and is rolling into 2021. Travel came to an almost stand-still in 20...
Apr 7, 2021
We explore how EDA tools enable hyper-convergent IC designs, supporting the PPA and yield targets required by advanced 3DICs and SoCs used in AI and HPC. The post Why Hyper-Convergent Chip Designs Call for a New Approach to Circuit Simulation appeared first on From Silicon T...
Apr 5, 2021
Back in November 2019, just a few short months before we all began an enforced… The post Collaboration and innovation thrive on diversity appeared first on Design with Calibre....

featured video

Learn the basics of Hall Effect sensors

Sponsored by Texas Instruments

This video introduces Hall Effect, permanent magnets and various magnetic properties. It'll walk through the benefits of Hall Effect sensors, how Hall ICs compare to discrete Hall elements and the different types of Hall Effect sensors.

Click here for more information

featured paper

Understanding the Foundations of Quiescent Current in Linear Power Systems

Sponsored by Texas Instruments

Minimizing power consumption is an important design consideration, especially in battery-powered systems that utilize linear regulators or low-dropout regulators (LDOs). Read this new whitepaper to learn the fundamentals of IQ in linear-power systems, how to predict behavior in dropout conditions, and maintain minimal disturbance during the load transient response.

Click here to download the whitepaper

Featured Chalk Talk

Keeping Your Linux Device Secure

Sponsored by Siemens Digital Industries Software

Embedded security is an ongoing process, not a one-time effort. Even after your design is shipped, security vulnerabilities are certain to be discovered - even in things like the operating system. In this episode of Chalk Talk, Amelia Dalton chats with Kathy Tufto from Mentor - a Siemens business, about how to make a plan to keep your Linux-based embedded design secure, and how to respond quickly when new vulnerabilities are discovered.

More information about Mentor Embedded Linux®