editor's blog
Subscribe Now

Conditioning Sensor Signals

Some time back, ZMDI made an announcement about a sensor conditioner they had released. A couple things gave me cause for pause as I looked it over. First was the description of a one-pass calibration process as being unique. The other was the fact that a major component of the advanced sensors you may see presented at conferences, examples of which we covered in a sensor article series earlier this year, is the associated circuitry required to turn a raw sensor output into a reliable, usable signal. I.e., conditioning the signal on the same chip as the sensor.

So I checked in with ZMDI to get their thoughts on both of these topics.

With respect to calibration, all sensors require it, worldly imperfections being what they are. Calibration involves measuring the response of the sensor and then applying corrections that are stored in the sensor; each unit has to be individually calibrated. The question is how you do it.

Some apparently correct using analog techniques; some, including ZMDI, use digital. Some – most of the analog ones in particular – use a multi-pass calibration process to set all of the various parameters because there may be coupling between them, so you need to set some values before measuring and setting others. So you do one measurement pass to acquire one set of values and set a correction. Then you do another pass and set a different parameter. Etc.

The one-pass approach measures all necessary data in one pass, and then offline software – e.g., in a PC – can calculate all of the corrections and program them into the sensor’s EEPROM. This is inherently a faster process than multi-pass.

As far as integrating the conditioner with the sensor is concerned, ZMDI agrees that, in principle, this can certainly be done and would be “a reasonable and mutually beneficial advancement,” although no ongoing projects at ZMDI were identified. They indicated that the kinds of sensors best suited to a combined solution are, of course, those that involve MEMS processes that integrate nicely with CMOS. Those include, in particular, piezo-electric sensors measuring things like pressure and strain as well as those that measure inertia – vibration and acceleration.

Leave a Reply

featured blogs
May 17, 2022
'Virtuoso Meets Maxwell' is a blog series aimed at exploring the capabilities and potential of Virtuoso® RF Solution and Virtuoso MultiTech. So, how does Virtuoso meet Maxwell? Now,... ...
May 17, 2022
Explore Arm's SystemReady program, and learn how we're simplifying hardware/software compliance through pre-silicon testing for Base System Architecture (BSA). The post Collaborating to Ensure that Software Just Works Across Arm-Based Hardware appeared first on From Silicon ...
May 12, 2022
By Shelly Stalnaker Every year, the editors of Elektronik in Germany compile a list of the most interesting and innovative… ...
Apr 29, 2022
What do you do if someone starts waving furiously at you, seemingly delighted to see you, but you fear they are being overenthusiastic?...

featured video

Intel® Agilex™ M-Series with HBM2e Technology

Sponsored by Intel

Intel expands the Intel® Agilex™ FPGA product offering with M-Series devices equipped with high fabric densities, in-package HBM2e memory, and DDR5 interfaces for high-memory bandwidth applications.

Learn more about the Intel® Agilex™ M-Series

featured paper

Reduce EV cost and improve drive range by integrating powertrain systems

Sponsored by Texas Instruments

When you can create automotive applications that do more with fewer parts, you’ll reduce both weight and cost and improve reliability. That’s the idea behind integrating electric vehicle (EV) and hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) designs.

Click to read more

featured chalk talk

Industrial Ethernet Next Generation Connections

Sponsored by Mouser Electronics and Amphenol ICC

No longer are hierarchical communication models effective in this new era of Industry 4.0. We need to look at an independent communication model that includes a single network with industrial ethernet at its core. In this episode of Chalk Talk, Amelia Dalton chats with Peter Swift about Amphenol’s SPE and iX Industrial family of connectors. They take a closer look at the details of these connector solutions and investigate why they are a great fit for the next generation of industrial automation applications.

Click here for more information about Amphenol ICC Industrial Ethernet Connectors & Cable Assemblies