editor's blog
Subscribe Now

Conditioning Sensor Signals

Some time back, ZMDI made an announcement about a sensor conditioner they had released. A couple things gave me cause for pause as I looked it over. First was the description of a one-pass calibration process as being unique. The other was the fact that a major component of the advanced sensors you may see presented at conferences, examples of which we covered in a sensor article series earlier this year, is the associated circuitry required to turn a raw sensor output into a reliable, usable signal. I.e., conditioning the signal on the same chip as the sensor.

So I checked in with ZMDI to get their thoughts on both of these topics.

With respect to calibration, all sensors require it, worldly imperfections being what they are. Calibration involves measuring the response of the sensor and then applying corrections that are stored in the sensor; each unit has to be individually calibrated. The question is how you do it.

Some apparently correct using analog techniques; some, including ZMDI, use digital. Some – most of the analog ones in particular – use a multi-pass calibration process to set all of the various parameters because there may be coupling between them, so you need to set some values before measuring and setting others. So you do one measurement pass to acquire one set of values and set a correction. Then you do another pass and set a different parameter. Etc.

The one-pass approach measures all necessary data in one pass, and then offline software – e.g., in a PC – can calculate all of the corrections and program them into the sensor’s EEPROM. This is inherently a faster process than multi-pass.

As far as integrating the conditioner with the sensor is concerned, ZMDI agrees that, in principle, this can certainly be done and would be “a reasonable and mutually beneficial advancement,” although no ongoing projects at ZMDI were identified. They indicated that the kinds of sensors best suited to a combined solution are, of course, those that involve MEMS processes that integrate nicely with CMOS. Those include, in particular, piezo-electric sensors measuring things like pressure and strain as well as those that measure inertia – vibration and acceleration.

Leave a Reply

featured blogs
Sep 21, 2021
Placing component leads accurately as per the datasheet is an important task while creating a package footprint symbol. As the pin pitch goes down, the size and location of the component lead play a... [[ Click on the title to access the full blog on the Cadence Community si...
Sep 21, 2021
Learn how our high-performance FPGA prototyping tools enable RTL debug for chip validation teams, eliminating simulation/emulation during hardware debugging. The post High Debug Productivity Is the FPGA Prototyping Game Changer: Part 1 appeared first on From Silicon To Softw...
Sep 18, 2021
Projects with a steampunk look-and-feel incorporate retro-futuristic technology and aesthetics inspired by 19th-century industrial steam-powered machinery....
Aug 5, 2021
Megh Computing's Video Analytics Solution (VAS) portfolio implements a flexible and scalable video analytics pipeline consisting of the following elements: Video Ingestion Video Transformation Object Detection and Inference Video Analytics Visualization   Because Megh's ...

featured video

Digital Design Technology Symposium

Sponsored by Synopsys

Are you an SoC designer or manager facing new design challenges driven by rapidly growing and emerging vertical segments for HPC, 5G, mobile, automotive and AI applications?

Join us at the Digital Design Technology Symposium.

featured paper

Choose a high CMTI gate driver that cuts your SiC switch dead-time

Sponsored by Maxim Integrated (now part of Analog Devices)

As GaN and SiC FETs begin to replace MOSFET and IGBT technologies in power switching applications, this Maxim paper discusses the key considerations when selecting an isolated gate driver. The paper explains the importance of CMTI and propagation delay skew and presents an isolated gate driver IC ideal for use with these new power transistors.

Click to read more

featured chalk talk

Minitek Microspace

Sponsored by Mouser Electronics and Amphenol ICC

With the incredible pace of automotive innovation these days, it’s important to choose the right connectors for the job. With everything from high-speed data to lighting, connectors have a huge impact on reliability, cost, and design. In this episode of Chalk Talk, Amelia Dalton chats with Glenn Heath from Amphenol ICC about the Minitek MicroSpace line of automotive- and industrial-grade connectors.

Click here for more information about Amphenol FCI Minitek MicroSpace™ Connector System