editor's blog
Subscribe Now

Calling all Conspirators!

I wrote a feature article on conspiracy theories among engineers.

What if, instead of “paranoid,” those engineers are really just “perceptive”?  Conspiracies like these folks are suspecting would obviously require a large number of excellent engineers to perpetrate.  No meaningful black helicopter operation could ever get off the ground without some good solid engineering behind it.

So, how about it conspiracy engineers… are you out there?  Are you retired? Have you left the fold?  Talk to us!

How does a conspiracy career in engineering compare to a more conventional one?  Is the pay better?  Are there benefits?  Do engineers ever leave conspiracy employment and join the mainstream?  Does your company employ both “regular” engineers plus “black ops” engineers whose job it is to monitor and control the “regular” ones?  If so, do you park in the same employee parking?  Do you eat in the same cafeteria?  Does your company softball team always let the other ones win to avoid attracting unwanted attention?

Are there technical conferences?  You know, ones where you’d present papers like: “An improved method for simultaneously monitoring source code progress and inflicting emotional damage on subject software developers.”

Are conspiracy engineers trained alongside more mainstream “planned obselescence” engineers?  (The guys that go in at night and plant fatal flaws in between the high-reliability elements the REST of us are trying to design into our systems?)

Surely some of you are retired or otherwise no longer encumbered by the need for secrecy – so fill us in.  We want to understand how some of this stuff works.

Leave a Reply

featured blogs
Sep 21, 2020
Technology is changing the strategies we use to do things - oh so fast that 2010 seems like a distant past- within many spaces -- including the way we do our current topic of interest - Timing... [[ Click on the title to access the full blog on the Cadence Community site. ]]...
Sep 21, 2020
Semicon, the world’s largest semiconductor conference and exhibition, is September 23-25 in Taiwan. Like most shows of its size and caliber, Semicon boasts a long and illustrious list of exhibitors (500+), and countless forums, symposiums, and workshops. Of course Semic...
Sep 18, 2020
[From the last episode: We put the various pieces of a memory together to show the whole thing.] Before we finally turn our memory discussion into an AI discussion, let'€™s take on one annoying little detail that I'€™ve referred to a few times, but have kept putting off. ...
Sep 16, 2020
In addition to the Great Highland (Scottish) bagpipes, the Uilleann (Irish) bagpipes, and the Northumbrian (English) bagpipes, there are myriad other offerings spanning the globe....

Featured Video

Texas Instruments: Pushing Power Further

Sponsored by Texas Instruments

Power is all around us. Every connection, every invention begins with power. Watch this short video to see how we are pushing the limits of power management.

Explore our power density portfolio

Featured Paper

Designing highly efficient, powerful and fast EV charging stations

Sponsored by Texas Instruments

Scaling the necessary power for fast EV charging stations can be challenging. One solution is to use modular power converters stacked in parallel.

Learn More in our technical article

Featured Chalk Talk

Intel NUC Elements

Sponsored by Mouser Electronics and Intel

Intel Next Unit of Computing (NUC) compute elements are small-form-factor barebone computer kits and components that are perfect for a wide variety of system designs. In this episode of Chalk Talk, Amelia Dalton chats with Kristin Brown of Intel System Product Group about pre-engineered solutions from Intel that can provide the appropriate level of computing power for your next design, with a minimal amount of development effort from your engineering team.

Click here for more information about Intel NUC 8 Compute Element (U-Series)