editor's blog
Subscribe Now

ARM’s Top Three Cellular Trends

At ARM’s recent TechCon event, I heard from James Bruce, their lead mobile strategist, who gave his views on the three trends he sees underway on the mobile front.

The first is the continued evolution of the smartphone; no surprise there. These are the machines that are expected to replace your laptop someday. At around $600, they’ll focus on features and performance. (And, addressing my kvetch comment following Jim’s article at the end of that link, yes, evidently docking stations are being prepared. He wasn’t able to share any names. I’m just glad I won’t be forced to thumb future articles on a phone.)

The second is the firming up of an entry-level smartphone category, in the $80 range. What will the user give up for that $520? Well, most of the costs are in the screen, the sensors, and in the technology required to make a phone super thin and super low-power. So this category would do much of what the super-smartphone would do, only slower, with less memory, fewer sensors, a larger battery, and lower-quality mechanics. He describes it as being like a 2009-10 smartphone, only cheaper.

The third is the emergence of LTE (long-term evolution) for increased capacity (roughly double) and consistent data rates. It also brings MIMO (multiple in/out) technology to improve reception in harsh urban environments.

Of course, there’s inconsistency in marketing LTE as a 3G or 4G technology. In the US, it’s called 4G because, well, because we like to market things as better than they are whenever we can get away with it. In Europe, on the other hand, they license spectrum per technology. So providers there are staying on the 3G bandwagon for as long as possible. When they move to 4G, they’ll have to pay new licensing fees.

For the record, LTE/Advanced is, according to James, truly a 4G technology.

After that? Well, bandwidth demand is doubling every couple years. Transmission technology can only do so much to keep up with that. Using more and smaller cells – down to the level of femtocells – will be a necessary complement to keep boosting overall system capacity.

Leave a Reply

featured blogs
May 7, 2021
In one of our Knowledge Booster Blogs a few months ago we introduced you to some tips and tricks for the optimal use of Virtuoso ADE Product Suite with our analog IC design videos . W e hope you... [[ Click on the title to access the full blog on the Cadence Community site. ...
May 7, 2021
Enough of the letter “P” already. Message recieved. In any case, modeling and simulating next-gen 224 Gbps signal channels poses many challenges. Design engineers must optimize the entire signal path, not just a specific component. The signal path includes transce...
May 6, 2021
Learn how correct-by-construction coding enables a more productive chip design process, as new code review tools address bugs early in the design process. The post Find Bugs Earlier Via On-the-Fly Code Checking for Productive Chip Design and Verification appeared first on Fr...
May 4, 2021
What a difference a year can make! Oh, we're not referring to that virus that… The post Realize Live + U2U: Side by Side appeared first on Design with Calibre....

featured video

Introduction to EMI

Sponsored by Texas Instruments

Conducted versus radiated EMI. CISPR-25 and CISPR-32 standards. High-frequency or low-frequency emissions. Designing a system to reduce EMI can be overwhelming, but it doesn’t have to be. Watch this video to get an overview of EMI causes, standards, and mitigation techniques.

Click here for more information

featured paper

Compact. Precise. Connected. Increase productivity with intelligent edge computing.

Sponsored by Texas Instruments

Smart devices in factories and buildings are getting smaller and more capable, with enhanced real-time control, robust connectivity, and configurable web services. Read about new processor technology that is unleashing the true potential of Industry 5.0 and the Internet of Things.

Click here to read more

Featured Chalk Talk

Bluetooth Overview

Sponsored by Mouser Electronics and Silicon Labs

Bluetooth has come a long way in recent years, and adding the latest Bluetooth features to your next design is easier than ever. It’s time to ditch the cables and go wireless. In this episode of Chalk Talk, Amelia Dalton chats with Mark Beecham of Silicon labs about the latest Bluetooth capabilities including lower power, higher bandwidth, mesh, and more, as well as solutions that will make adding Bluetooth to your next design a snap.

Click here for more information about Silicon Labs EFR32BG Blue Gecko Wireless SoCs