editor's blog
Subscribe Now

Power Contributors

At the recent Si2 conference, there was an interesting presentation by IBM’s David Hathaway on what is hoped to be a better way of approaching power modeling at the technology level.

He said that power modeling can be approached differently from delay modeling. With delay, there are numerous effects that combine in complex, non-linear ways, and so a full characterization of each cell is necessary. But with power, because interpolation is risky, many more points are needed, making full characterization a really time-consuming chore.

The good news, he proposed, is that the elements contributing to power can be separated out as more or less orthogonal to each other. Specific power contributors can be isolated, and then each cell can be defined in terms of its contributors. Only the contributors have to be characterized (tens of tests rather than hundreds), and then they can be summed cell by cell.

In an experiment to test this theory out, they compared the calculated value with full-up actual values. 95% of the simulations that would have normally been needed were eliminated, and the average error was 0.073%, with the worst-case error being 3.64%.

There’s more work to be done both at the dynamic and leakage level, but it felt like there’s some promise to this approach, with the potential of making it easier to create new technology models.

Leave a Reply

featured blogs
Sep 27, 2020
https://youtu.be/EUDdGqdmTUU Made in "the Alps" Monday: Complete RF Solution: Think Outside the Chip Tuesday: The First Decade of RISC-V: A Worldwide Phenomenon Wednesday: The European... [[ Click on the title to access the full blog on the Cadence Community site. ...
Sep 25, 2020
What do you think about earphone-style electroencephalography sensors that would allow your boss to monitor your brainwaves and collect your brain data while you are at work?...
Sep 25, 2020
Weird weather is one the things making 2020 memorable. As I look my home office window (WFH – yet another 2020 “thing”!), it feels like mid-summer in late September. In some places like Key West or Palm Springs, that is normal. In Pennsylvania, it is not. My...
Sep 25, 2020
[From the last episode: We looked at different ways of accessing a single bit in a memory, including the use of multiplexors.] Today we'€™re going to look more specifically at memory cells '€“ these things we'€™ve been calling bit cells. We mentioned that there are many...

Featured Video

AI SoC Chats: IP for In-Memory / Near-Memory Compute

Sponsored by Synopsys

AI chipsets are data hungry and have high compute intensity, leading to potential power consumption issues. Join Synopsys Fellow Jamil Kawa to learn how in-memory or near-memory compute, 3D stacking, and other innovations can address the challenges of making chips think like the human brain.

Click here for more information about DesignWare IP for Amazing AI

Featured Paper

Helping physicians achieve faster, more accurate patient diagnoses with molecular test technology

Sponsored by Texas Instruments

Point-of-care molecular diagnostics (PoC) help physicians achieve faster, more accurate patient diagnoses and treatment decisions. This article breaks down how molecular test technology works and the building blocks for a PoC molecular diagnostics analyzer sensor front end system.

Read the Article

Featured Chalk Talk

Bluetooth Overview

Sponsored by Mouser Electronics and Silicon Labs

Bluetooth has come a long way in recent years, and adding the latest Bluetooth features to your next design is easier than ever. It’s time to ditch the cables and go wireless. In this episode of Chalk Talk, Amelia Dalton chats with Mark Beecham of Silicon labs about the latest Bluetooth capabilities including lower power, higher bandwidth, mesh, and more, as well as solutions that will make adding Bluetooth to your next design a snap.

Click here for more information about Silicon Labs EFR32BG Blue Gecko Wireless SoCs