editor's blog
Subscribe Now

Where do you want to get to your data?

Harris did a poll recently at the behest of a German company called TeamViewer that provides access to computer data from anywhere. The study asks questions about where people want to be able to access data they don’t have with them. I’m assuming they also did the study before developing the product, but this data is recent.

While TeamViewer provided some distilled statistics in their press release, they also put some raw data tables in there, which provide a couple other humorous insights.

The real take-away from this whole thing is that people are addicted to their data. They want access from places that you would think are wholly inappropriate. Well, largely inappropriate. I should caution… the easy reading of this is that this data reflects what people said they wanted. That’s not strictly true. Here’s the wording on the question:

“During which of the following scenarios, if any, do you think someone might want the freedom to access their work or home computer? Please select all that apply.”

So… this isn’t “where would you want the freedom…”; it’s “where would someone…” In other words, “I would never do that, but I’m sure someone would.” The responses are, nonetheless, interesting.

8 scenarios were posed (plus an obligatory “other”; we’ll ignore that). And people responded as to those in which they envisioned people wanting their data. To wit:

  • While on vacation: 74%.
  • While in bed: 48%.
  • While shopping with a spouse: 36%. (What, you never wanted to sneak off to your porn while she was shopping?)
  • While at a sporting event: 29%.
  • While driving/on the road: 28%. (This is the Darwin pool. Soon to be out of the gene pool.)
  • During a honeymoon or romantic getaway: 17%. (Can you say buzzkill?)
  • During a date: 11%. ON A DATE, PEOPLE!! Tell me you’re calling up your baby pictures…
  • While at a church/house of worship: 8% (Finally, a modicum of decorum… Those 8% are probably apostate anyway…)

They also split out the demographics by marriage status. And here’s what you gotta love:

 

Married

Single or
Never married

Divorced or
Separated or
Widowed

Vacation

84

87

73

In bed

43

61

36

Shopping with
spouse

35

41

24

Sporting event

28

35

19

Driving

28

33

21

Honeymoon/
romantic getaway

16

20

10

Date

10

13

8

Church

7

11

6

 

In EVERY category, the never-been-married people are most likely and the no-longer-married people are least likely to want to check their data in any scenario. Married folks are in the middle.

My interpretation:

  • Single dude: “Yeah, so, what’s wrong with that?”
  • Married dude: “Seems to be working…”
  • Ex-married dude: “OK, that didn’t work…”

You can check out their release here

Leave a Reply

featured blogs
Apr 9, 2021
You probably already know what ISO 26262 is. If you don't, then you can find out in several previous posts: "The Safest Train Is One that Never Leaves the Station" History of ISO 26262... [[ Click on the title to access the full blog on the Cadence Community s...
Apr 8, 2021
We all know the widespread havoc that Covid-19 wreaked in 2020. While the electronics industry in general, and connectors in particular, took an initial hit, the industry rebounded in the second half of 2020 and is rolling into 2021. Travel came to an almost stand-still in 20...
Apr 7, 2021
We explore how EDA tools enable hyper-convergent IC designs, supporting the PPA and yield targets required by advanced 3DICs and SoCs used in AI and HPC. The post Why Hyper-Convergent Chip Designs Call for a New Approach to Circuit Simulation appeared first on From Silicon T...
Apr 5, 2021
Back in November 2019, just a few short months before we all began an enforced… The post Collaboration and innovation thrive on diversity appeared first on Design with Calibre....

featured video

Learn the basics of Hall Effect sensors

Sponsored by Texas Instruments

This video introduces Hall Effect, permanent magnets and various magnetic properties. It'll walk through the benefits of Hall Effect sensors, how Hall ICs compare to discrete Hall elements and the different types of Hall Effect sensors.

Click here for more information

featured paper

Understanding Functional Safety FIT Base Failure Rate Estimates per IEC 62380 and SN 29500

Sponsored by Texas Instruments

Functional safety standards such as IEC 61508 and ISO 26262 require semiconductor device manufacturers to address both systematic and random hardware failures. Base failure rates (BFR) quantify the intrinsic reliability of the semiconductor component while operating under normal environmental conditions. Download our white paper which focuses on two widely accepted techniques to estimate the BFR for semiconductor components; estimates per IEC Technical Report 62380 and SN 29500 respectively.

Click here to download the whitepaper

featured chalk talk

Time Sensitive Networking for Industrial Automation

Sponsored by Mouser Electronics and Intel

In control applications with strict deterministic requirements, such as those found in automotive and industrial domains, Time Sensitive Networking offers a way to send time-critical traffic over a standard Ethernet infrastructure. This enables the convergence of all traffic classes and multiple applications in one network. In this episode of Chalk Talk, Amelia Dalton chats with Josh Levine of Intel and Patrick Loschmidt of TTTech about standards, specifications, and capabilities of time-sensitive networking (TSN).

Click here for more information about Intel Cyclone® V FPGAs