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Samtec Expands Edge Card Offering With New Low-Profile PCI Express® Edge Card Connector

Low-profile, high-speed PCI Express® Gen 4 compliant edge card connector

New Albany, IN: Samtec announces the release of a new low-profile PCI Express® edge card connector featuring Edge Rate® contacts for optimized signal integrity. The connector is PCI Express® Gen 4 compliant and supports one, four, eight and sixteen links for different bandwith requirements.

This 1.00 mm (.0394”) pitch PCI Express® edge card connector (PCIE-LP Series) has a low 8 mm profile, 3 mm less than the standard 11 mm profile with an identical 3.50 mm contact wipe. Ultimately this provides more vertical space in a standard size chassis with a set form factor allowing for greater system air flow and space to route other components over the connector. The low 8 mm profile is also an ideal solution for applications where space is limited or dimensions are not pre-determined.

“We are excited to introduce the new PCIE-LP Series, which adds to Samtec’s already extensive and diverse edge card solutions,” said Terry Emerson, Micro Rugged Project Manager at Samtec, Inc.  “This interconnect meshes high-speed signals with a smaller than industry standard form factor and enables customers to have more flexibility when designing their systems.”

With PCI Express® Gen 4 compliance, this edge card connector achieves an 16 GT/s bit rate to meet the industry demands for increased bandwidth. Support of the PCI Express® protocol ensures low latency, power savings and guaranteed transmission of the connector.

The featured Edge Rate® contact system increases cycle life and minimizes the effects of broadside coupling, which decreases crosstalk for superior signal integrity performance and impedance control. This rugged contact system is also less prone to damage when “zippered” during unmating.

Standard PCI Express® expansion cards, 1.60 mm (.062”) thick cards and Samtec’s PCI Express® jumpers (PCIEC Series) mate with the low-profile edge card connector, making it a good alternative to the standard PCI Express® edge card. Polarization to ensure proper mating and surface mount tails are standard options; press-fit tails are in development.

For more information, please visit Samtec’s PCI Express® Edge Card webpage.

PCI-SIG®, PCI Express® and the PCIe® design marks are registered trademarks and/or service marks of PCI-SIG.

About Samtec, Inc.: 
Founded in 1976, Samtec is a privately held, $661 million global manufacturer of a broad line of electronic interconnect solutions, including IC-to-Board and IC Packaging, High Speed Board-to-Board, High Speed Cables, Mid-Board and Panel Optics, Flexible Stacking, and Micro/Rugged components and cables. Samtec Technology Centers are dedicated to developing and advancing technologies, strategies and products to optimize both the performance and cost of a system from the bare die to an interface 100 meters away, and all interconnect points in between. With 33 locations in 18 different countries, Samtec’s global presence enables its unmatched customer service. For more information, please visit   http://www.samtec.com.

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