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Cadence Functional Safety Verification Solution Adopted for ISO 26262-Compliant Automotive IC Development Flow at ROHM


SAN JOSE, Calif., July 19, 2017—Cadence Design Systems, Inc. (NASDAQ: CDNS) today announced that the Cadence® Functional Safety Verification Solution was adopted by ROHM CO., Ltd. in its design flow for ISO 26262-compliant ICs and LSIs for the automotive market. The Cadence fault simulation technology and seamless reuse of functional and mixed-signal verification environments enables an ISO 26262-compliant development flow that can reduce the effort required to complete the safety verification process up to 50 percent. For more information about automotive solutions from Cadence, visit http://www.cadence.com/go/automotive.

The Cadence fault simulation technology can effectively address the many complexities associated with automotive design verification. The simulator allows for successful fault effect analysis for various fault modes that are required for achieving compliance with the ISO 26262 standard, including single event transient (SET), single event upset (SEU), stuck-at 0/stuck-at 1, and dual-point faults, while outperforming existing design-for-test (DFT)-based flows for safety-related fault effect analysis. Additionally, a congruent tool chain with Cadence Incisive® logic simulators enables a reduction in design modification time and allows for the re-use of existing testbenches for fault injection simulations.

“The Cadence Functional Safety Verification Solution has enabled us to successfully verify that our ICs and LSIs for the automotive market are ISO 26262 compliant,” said Akira Nakamura, LSI Product Development Headquarters, ROHM CO., Ltd. “The fault simulation has made it easy for us to handle various fault modes, including transient faults, and allowed us to reuse testbenches without any additional modifications. We’ve obtained a reliable, robust solution that we can depend on for our automotive designs.”

The Cadence Functional Safety Verification Solution automates what can otherwise be a manual, time-consuming process of complying with functional safety requirements. It is part of the Cadence Verification Suite’s application-optimized solution for automotive devices. It also supports the company’s System Design Enablement strategy, which enables system and semiconductor companies to create complete, differentiated end products more efficiently.

About Cadence
Cadence enables electronic systems and semiconductor companies to create the innovative end products that are transforming the way people live, work and play. Cadence software, hardware and semiconductor IP are used by customers to deliver products to market faster. The company’s System Design Enablement strategy helps customers develop differentiated products—from chips to boards to systems—in mobile, consumer, cloud datacenter, automotive, aerospace, IoT, industrial and other market segments. Cadence is listed as one of Fortune Magazine’s 100 Best Companies to Work For. Learn more at cadence.com.

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