fresh bytes
Subscribe Now

AI may be able to smell illnesses in human breath

Artificial intelligence (AI) is best known for its ability to see (as in driverless cars) and listen (as in Alexa and other home assistants). From now on, it may also smell. My colleagues and I are developing an AI system that can smell human breath and learn how to identify a range of illness-revealing substances that we might breathe out.

The sense of smell is used by animals and even plants to identify hundreds of different substances that float in the air. But compared to that of other animals, the human sense of smell is far less developed and certainly not used to carry out daily activities. For this reason, humans aren’t particularly aware of the richness of information that can be transmitted through the air, and can be perceived by a highly sensitive olfactory system. AI may be about to change that.

For a few decades, laboratories around the world have been able to use machines to detect very small amounts of substances in the air. Those machines, called gas-chromatography mass-spectrometers or GC-MS, can analyze the air to discover thousands of different molecules known as volatile organic compounds.

Read more at Smithsonianmag.com

Leave a Reply

featured blogs
Sep 21, 2018
On Labor day, I didn't get the day off since I was in Delhi. I had to labor, not celebrate it by eating barbecue. Instead, I ate chicken curry, naan, and fried okra at the lunch I had with Jaswinder Ahuja in a conference room. I knew he had just passed his 30-year annive...
Sep 20, 2018
When many modern high-tech weapons were developed, such as nuclear weapon systems, computer capabilities were a fraction of what they are now. Few could have predicted the strides that......
Sep 18, 2018
Samtec performs several tests in-house as part of our qualification testing on a product series; including Low Level Contact Resistance (LLCR). It measures the amount of resistance in a position on a part. LLCR is used in combination with several other tests to track the over...
Sep 9, 2018
  The lease listing on the Pacific American Group'€™s Web site reads: '€œEight Forty Four East Charleston Road is a historically relevant commercial building in Palo Alto. This building was key in the development of Silicon Valley'€™s computer business. Here, Rober...