Sep 22, 2014

Artist recreates famous photographs with John Malkovich

posted by Laura Domela

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Dorothea Lange - Migrant Mother, Nipomo, California (1936)

The photographer Sandro Miller contacted the famous actor John Malkovich to pitch his novel premise for a project: Miller would duplicate iconic photographic portraits using Malkovich as the subject. Malkovich would have to dress up a bit, wear makeup, or even be naked. He would become Andy Warhol, Albert Einstein, John Lennon, and other people captured for posterity by the world's greatest photographers.
via Neatorama and Blame it on the Voices

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Diane Arbus - Identical Twins, Roselle, New Jersey (1967)

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Sep 22, 2014

50 years of Moog, the analog synth that still beats 1s and 0s

posted by Laura Domela

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This time last year, I walked into a Toronto store called Moog Audio and walked out with a Teenage Engineering OP-1—a curious little portable digital synthesizer that looks, at first glance, like a child’s toy. It has a row of just four candy-colored knobs as primary input controls, and there are only enough keys for an octave-and-a-half's worth of range. But damn does it ever sound cool. Its tiny OLED screen uses all sorts of clever visual conceits to convey otherwise complex audio transformations. Colors and animations explain the differences between synthesizer engines, changes to modulation and frequency, and attack and decay. And it's done in a way that’s easy for anyone with little synthesizer knowledge to understand while still being powerful in more experienced hands. This is a synthesizer, drum machine, and four-track recorder all-in-one—all in a device that fits inside a purse or messenger bag with ease.

It wasn’t always like this. In fact, it was 50 years ago this year that, in 1964, a man by the name of Bob Moog unveiled a synthesizer of a very different sort. Called the Moog Modular, it is regarded as one of the first. Though Moog wouldn’t officially advertise his creation as a synthesizer until 1966, that’s precisely what it was—an array of electronic modules that Moog designed, often controlled via keyboard, and connected to one another with a bird's nest of cables that, somehow, produced weird musical sounds unlike anything anyone had heard before.
via ars technica

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Sep 22, 2014

DARPA working on portable and ruggedized artificial "biospleen" to fight sepsis

posted by Larra Morris

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Today, when we think of the dangers of the battlefield, we think of wounds caused by bullets, bombs, and other weapons. But as late as the Spanish American war of 1898, the number of soldiers who died from infectious diseases as opposed to directly from combat injuries was seven to one. Thanks to the discovery of penicillin and other antibiotics, that ratio has swung dramatically the other way, but it’s still a major problem, not only for military personnel, but civilians too. DARPA is developing an artificial spleen, or "biospleen," as a way to help fight deadly infections without antibiotics.
via Gizmag

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Image: DARPA

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Sep 22, 2014

The design of spoons and knives can change the way we taste food

posted by Larra Morris

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Chances are, you've spent more time thinking about the specs on your smartphone than about the gadgets that you use to put food in your mouth. But the shape and material properties of forks, spoons, and knives turn out to matter—a lot. Changes in the design of cutlery have not only affected how and what we eat, but also what our food tastes like. There's even evidence that the adoption of the table knife transformed the shape of European faces.
via Gizmodo

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Sep 22, 2014

Interactive sculpture dispenses paint according to the mood of local social media

posted by Larra Morris

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Be careful what you tweet, because your feelings could be immortalized in a piece of public art. At least that’s what happened in Oslo when Syver Lauritzsen and Eirik Haugen Murvold publicly displayed a sculpture called MONOLITT.

MONOLITT is an interactive installation that quite literally paints the mood of the city, using social media feeds as an input. The installation takes electronic signals and lets them manifest themselves in the physical world. Using sentiment analytics, the installation links tweets to corresponding colored paints in realtime, feeding them out through the top of the sculpture, letting them flow into a procedurally generated three-dimensional painting.
via Make

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Sep 21, 2014

The International Space Station gets a 3D printer and a crew of mousetronauts

posted by Laura Domela

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All together now: MICE…IN…SPAAAAAAACE!

Last night, SpaceX successfully launched its unmanned Dragon cargo ship, which will rendezvous with the ISS on Tuesday. A third of Dragon’s 2.5 tons of cargo was made up of food, sundries, and care packages for the astronauts. The rest was comprised of scientific gear that will help the crew complete over 255 experiments. Among these was the ISS’ first 3D printer, which will be used to test the feasibility of making tools and tech on demand in zero-G. If they don’t start calling it the “industrial replicator,” they’re missing a huge opportunity.
via The Mary Sue

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Sep 20, 2014

High-tech watercraft transforms from monohull, to catamaran, to trimaran, to hydrofoil

posted by Laura Domela

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The Kormoran from the Austrian company of the same name can speed on (and above) the water as a catamaran, trimaran, monohull and hydrofoil, making it one of the most versatile vessels to ever hit the high seas. A pair of hydraulically actuated hulls allows it to transform before your eyes, even while in motion.
via Gizmag

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