Dec 18, 2014

Scientists put worm brain in robot body

posted by Larra Morris

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The group of scientists who created the Open Worm Project have successfully mapped the connections of all 302 neurons in a roundworm's brain, simulated them as a piece of computer software, and uploaded that software to a LEGO robot. So now there's a LEGO robot that acts like a worm.
via Geekologie

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Dec 17, 2014

How to create mushroom designs on an oscilloscope signal detector using sound

posted by Larra Morris

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Electronic musician Jerobeam Fenderson has created a video tutorial demonstrating how to draw mushroom-like designs on an oscilloscope signal-detecting machine using only sound. The tutorial does require some prior knowledge of the machine, but the results are still impressive even for the uninitiated.
via Laughing Squid

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Dec 17, 2014

The Navy’s new robot looks and swims just like a shark

posted by Larra Morris

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The American military does a lot of work in the field of biomimicry, stealing designs from nature for use in new technology. After all, if you’re going to design a robot, where better to draw inspiration than from billions of years of evolution? The latest result of these efforts is the GhostSwimmer: The Navy’s underwater drone designed to look and swim like a real fish, and a liability to spook the bejeezus out of any beach goer who’s familiar with Jaws.

The new gizmo, at five feet long and nearly 100 pounds, is about the size of an albacore tuna but looks more like a shark, at least from a distance. It’s part of an experiment to explore the possibilities of using biomimetic, unmanned, underwater vehicles, and the Navy announced it wrapped up testing of the design last week.
via Wired

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Image: Edward Guttierrez/US Navy 

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Dec 17, 2014

4 seconds of body cam video can reveal a biometric fingerprint, study says

posted by Larra Morris

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Researchers say they can have computers examine body camera video footage and accurately identify a person wearing a body-mounted device in about four seconds, according to a recently released paper. The authors of the study had their software look at biometric characteristics like height, stride length, and walking speed to find the identity of the person shooting the footage. As they point out, this could have both positive and negative implications for civilians, law enforcement, and military personnel if they're using body-mounted cameras. (It's important to note that this research paper, Egocentric Video Biometrics, was posted to the arXiv repository. As such, it's not considered a final, peer-reviewed work.)
via Ars Technica

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Image: Marek Ziolkowski

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Dec 16, 2014

Could Cinderella's glass slippers physically exist without shattering?

posted by Larra Morris

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Now, let's talk about failure. No, not about Cinderella's failure to keep her shoes on her feet, but about mechanical failure. Whenever we design something that needs to bear force, we test for various possible modes of failure and try to ensure that our object is strong against all of them.

Now, one possible way the slippers could break is by yielding to the compressive stress arising due to Cinderella's weight. But will that happen?
via Gizmodo

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Dec 16, 2014

The Cicret Bracelet, a bracelet that projects an interactive touchscreen display on its wearer’s forearm

posted by Larra Morris

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The Cicret Bracelet is a wrist-worn wearable device that projects the screen of its wearer’s smartphone on their forearm, creating a sort of skin-based touchscreen display. The futuristic device, which is currently seeking donations, allows users to interact with their phone’s apps without removing their handset from their pocket. It’s even waterproof, so wearers can interact their smartphone in the tub.
via Laughing Squid

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Dec 16, 2014

Study shows magazines in doctors' offices are old because you keep stealing the new ones

posted by Larra Morris

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The British Medical Journal has published a paper investigating the lack of up to date magazines in the waiting rooms of medical practices. It's because the new ones walk out the door.

Results: 47 of the 82 magazines with a visible date on the front cover were aged less than 2 months. 28 of these 47 (60%) magazines and 10 of the 35 (29%) older magazines disappeared (P=0.002). After 31 days, 41 of the 87 (47%, 95% confidence interval 37% to 58%) magazines had disappeared. None of the 19 non-gossipy magazines (the Economist and Time magazine) had disappeared compared with 26 of the 27 (96%) gossipy magazines (P<0.001). All 15 of the most gossipy magazines and all 19 of the non-gossipy magazines had disappeared by 31 days. The study was terminated at this point.

Conclusions: General practice waiting rooms contain mainly old magazines. This phenomenon relates to the disappearance of the magazines rather than to the supply of old ones. Gossipy magazines were more likely to disappear than non-gossipy ones.
via Boing Boing

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