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UltraSoC joins the OpenHW Group and extends its commitment to an open-source future for technology development

CAMBRIDGE, UK – 21 November 2019

UltraSoC today announced it has joined the OpenHW Group, the global not-for-profit organization established earlier this year to further the adoption of open source processors, particularly for high volume production systems-on-chip (SoCs). As part of its involvement, UltraSoC will contribute its substantial experience and IP in the area of system-level debug and processor trace. UltraSoC is committed to supporting its customers using all open-source and proprietary technologies and is seeing an increasing number of designs supporting mixed (heterogeneous) processor hardware.

The OpenHW Group has already announced a range of cores, dubbed CORE-V, based on the RISC-V open ISA. Both UltraSoC and the OpenHW Group are active members of the RISC-V Foundation, and development in this area will be a key part of UltraSoC’s initial contribution to the group.

Launched in June 2019, the OpenHW Group provides a complete infrastructure for hosting high quality open-source hardware developments. The Group, comprised of 25 member and partner organizations, operates as a not-for-profit, driven by its members and individual contributors, where hardware and software designers collaborate globally in the development of open-source cores, as well as related IP, tools and software.

Rick O’Connor, Founder and CEO of OpenHW Group, added, “I am delighted that UltraSoC is bringing its significant and broad ‘platform agnostic’ embedded systems expertise to the OpenHW Group. I am confident the OpenHW Group ecosystem will benefit greatly from UltraSoC’s insights into building and operating reliable systems based on a wide range of open-source and heterogeneous hardware.”

UltraSoC CEO, Rupert Baines, commented, “The OpenHW Group is just what the industry needs today to make it easier to develop real systems using open-source hardware – these developments are increasingly presenting an equal or better option to proprietary CPU-based alternatives. We congratulate Rick and the team for the enlightened initiative and look forward to getting involved.”

About UltraSoC

UltraSoC is a pioneering developer of analytics and monitoring technology at the heart of the systems-on-chip (SoCs) that power today’s electronic products. The company’s embedded analytics technology allows product designers to add advanced cybersecurity, functional safety and performance tuning features; and it helps resolve critical issues such as increasing system complexity and ever-decreasing time-to-market. UltraSoC’s technology is delivered as semiconductor IP and software to customers in the consumer electronics, computing and communications industries. For more information visit www.ultrasoc.com. For more information visit www.ultrasoc.com.

About the OpenHW Group

OpenHW Group is a not-for-profit, global organization driven by its members and individual contributors where hardware and software designers collaborate in the development of open-source cores, related IP, tools and software such as the CORE-V Family of cores. OpenHW provides an infrastructure for hosting high quality open-source HW developments in line with industry best practices.

CORE-V is a series of RISC-V based open-source cores with associated processor subsystem IP, tools and software for electronic system designers. The CORE-V family provides quality core IP in line with industry best practices. The IP is available in both silicon and FPGA optimized implementations. These cores can be used to facilitate rapid design innovation and ensure effective manufacturability of high-volume production SoCs.

Website: OpenHWGroup.org

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