industry news
Subscribe Now

OpenVPX Faceplates From Pixus are Customizable for Supplemental Air Intake

Waterloo, Ontario  —  Nov 19, 2019 –  Pixus Technologies, a provider of embedded computing and enclosure solutions, offers front faceplate panels for OpenVPX modules with customized cutouts.  These hole patterns include designs for airflow intake.  

Highly compact OpenVPX systems where the modules are loaded horizontally often have minimal space available for airflow intake in front-to-rear cooling configurations.  To supplement the chassis cooling, it can be beneficial to have air intake holes that allow more airflow to be pulled directly over the OpenVPX modules.  With Pixus’ custom front panel and chassis design capability, the company can offer an optimized cooling solution for high power and density systems.

 The customizable front panels come in 3U and 6U sizes with various widths depending on the solution requirements. 

Pixus offers OpenVPX backplanes, chassis platforms, components, and specialty products.  The company also provides ruggedization and enclosure customization services. 

 About Pixus Technologies

Leveraging over 20 years of innovative standard products, the Pixus team is comprised of industry experts in electronics packaging. Founded in 2009 by senior management from Kaparel Corporation, a Rittal company, Pixus Technologies’ embedded backplanes and systems are focused primarily on  ATCA, OpenVPX, MicroTCA, and custom designs.    Pixus also has an extensive offering of VME-based and cPCI-based solutions.   In May 2011, Pixus Technologies became the sole authorized North and South American supplier of the electronic packaging products previously offered by Kaparel Corporation and Rittal.  

Leave a Reply

featured blogs
Aug 1, 2021
https://youtu.be/I0AYf5V_irg Made in Long Ridge Open Space Preserve (camera Carey Guo) Monday: HOT CHIPS 2021 Preview Tuesday: Designed with Cadence Video Series Wednesday: July Update Thursday:... [[ Click on the title to access the full blog on the Cadence Community site. ...
Jul 30, 2021
You can't attack what you can't see, and cloaking technology for devices on Ethernet LANs is merely one of many protection layers implemented in Q-Net Security's Q-Box to protect networked devices and transaction between these devices from cyberattacks. Other security technol...
Jul 29, 2021
Learn why SoC emulation is the next frontier for power system optimization, helping chip designers shift power verification left in the SoC design flow. The post Why Wait Days for Results? The Next Frontier for Power Verification appeared first on From Silicon To Software....
Jul 28, 2021
Here's a sticky problem. What if the entire Earth was instantaneously replaced with an equal volume of closely packed, but uncompressed blueberries?...

featured video

Adopt a Shift-left Methodology to Accelerate Your Product Development Process

Sponsored by Cadence Design Systems

Validate your most sophisticated SoC designs before silicon and stay on schedule. Balance your workload between simulation, emulation and prototyping for complete system validation. You need the right tool for the right job. Emulation meets prototyping -- Cadence Palladium and Protium Dynamic Duo for IP/SoC verification, hardware and software regressions, and early software development.

More information about Emulation and Prototyping

featured paper

Configure the charge and discharge current separately in a reversible buck/boost regulator

Sponsored by Maxim Integrated

The design of a front-end converter can be made less complicated when minimal extra current overhead is required for charging the supercapacitor. This application note explains how to configure the reversible buck/boost converter to achieve a lighter impact on the system during the charging phase. Setting the charge current requirement to the minimum amount keeps the discharge current availability intact.

Click to read more

featured chalk talk

Nordic Cellular IoT

Sponsored by Mouser Electronics and Nordic Semiconductor

Adding cellular connectivity to your IoT design is a complex undertaking, requiring a broad set of engineering skills and expertise. For most teams, this can pose a serious schedule challenge in getting products out the door. In this episode of Chalk Talk, Amelia Dalton chats with Kristian Sæther of Nordic Semiconductor about the easiest path to IoT cellular connectivity with the Nordic nRF9160 low-power system-in-package solution.

Click here for more information about Nordic Semiconductor nRF91 Cellular IoT Modules