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New Horizontal-Mount OpenVPX Chassis Platforms from Pixus Technologies

Waterloo, Ontario —May 15, 2019  –  Pixus Technologies, a provider of embedded computing and enclosure solutions, has announced new OpenVPX enclosures that allow boards to be mounted horizontally.   The horizontal loading approach saves rack height for small slot count systems. 

The first in the series of EUR19VPX OpenVPX horizontal-mount chassis platforms from Pixus Technologies is a 2U high enclosure.  The design allows dual 6U boards, quad 3U boards, or a hybrid mix to be utilized in the chassis.   The cooling is achieved via a front-to-rear airflow orientation.  The boards are standardly front loaded and options are available for rear loading.  Versions in 1U, 3U, and 4U heights are on the roadmap. 

The 2U EUR19VPX features an OpenVPX backplane at PCIe Gen3 speeds standard.  Higher speed versions and VITA 66/67 connector options are available upon request.  The chassis allows either pluggable VITA 62 PSUs or a fixed modular VPX power supply.   Specialty card guides that accept conduction-cooled modules can be incorporated into the enclosure.

Pixus also offers OpenVPX chassis platforms in rugged rackmount, ATR, test/development, HOST/SOSA, and high CFM RiCool versions.  The company supports additional backplane/chassis architectures, including MicroTCA, AdvancedTCA, cPCI Serial, and legacy VME/cPCI. 

 About Pixus Technologies

Leveraging over 25 years of innovative standard products, the Pixus team is comprised of industry experts in electronics packaging. Founded in 2009 by senior management from Kaparel Corporation, a Rittal company, Pixus Technologies’ embedded backplanes and systems are focused primarily on  ATCA, OpenVPX, MicroTCA, cPCI Serial, and custom designs.    Pixus also has an extensive offering of VME-based and cPCI-based solutions.   In May 2011, Pixus Technologies became the sole authorized North and South American supplier of the electronic packaging products previously offered by Kaparel Corporation and Rittal.  

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