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Hyperloop contest: Infineon chips accelerate Technical University of Munich’s pod to fourth win in a row

Munich, Germany, 22 July, 2019 – Traveling at the speed of sound? The inventors of the Hyperloop believe that this will be possible someday. We would then travel in pods through a tube in a partial vacuum at speeds of up to 1,200 kilometers per hour. Engineers around the world are working on the technology.

During the night from Sunday to Monday, students from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) once again won the SpaceX Hyperloop Pod Competition near Los Angeles, a speed competition for pod prototypes. Equipped with more than 420 Infineon chips, the pod reached 463.5 km/h. This speed would shorten the trip from Munich to Hamburg to about one hour and 15 minutes, for example. The team left its competitors lagging well behind. Their pod was more than 200 km/h faster than the one that came in second.

This information is available online at
https://www.infineon.com/cms/en/about-infineon/press/press-releases/2019/INFATV201907-089.html

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