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Deep Learning Acceleration Startup Mipsology to Exhibit at Xilinx Developer Forum

Will Showcase Zebra for Pain-Free, FPGA-based Deep Learning Acceleration

SAN JOSE, Calif., Sept. 28, 2018 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) —

WHO: Mipsology, a Xilinx partner focused on deep learning acceleration

WHAT: Will present “Conceal the field programmable gate array (FPGA) behind the AI” during the Xilinx Developer Forum. It will demonstrate Zebra, a breakthrough high-performance software stack to simplify deployment of FPGAs in neural networks computation. Mipsology’s proprietary software stack sits on top of Xilinx FPGAs to enable scientists and engineers working in artificial intelligence to deploy their neural networks without the FPGA knowledge typically found in the hardware design community.

WHEN: Monday and Tuesday, October 1 and 2.

WHERE: Fairmont San Jose, San Jose, Calif.

About Mipsology

Mipsology is a startup developing state-of-the-art Xilinx FPGA-based accelerators targeted for deep learning applications in neural networks. It was founded in 2015 by a team of engineers and scientists who created a family of world-class FPGA-based super computers over the past 20 years.

Find Mipsology at:
Website: http://mipsology.com/

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