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Core Avionics & Industrial Inc. Announces Partnership with Arm to Develop Safety Critical Graphics Processing Solutions

Arm TechCon, San Jose, California, October 8, 2019: Core Avionics & Industrial Inc. (“CoreAVI”) announced a technology partnership with Arm today to work together on solutions for safety critical graphics processing for next generation automotive systems.

This partnership will help simplify and lower the risks of achieving the most stringent levels of safety certification by automotive system manufacturers. CoreAVI is uniquely positioned to bring lessons learned from aerospace digital cockpit safety use cases to the automotive safety market. This will enable automotive manufacturers and suppliers to efficiently deploy safety critical cockpit applications such as digital clusters, head-up displays, augmented vision systems, digital mirrors and advanced driver-assistance systems (ADAS).

“As next-generation vehicles evolve, and advances are made in improving and enhancing the driver experience, safety is critical across these systems,” said Chet Babla, vice president of automotive, Automotive and IoT Line of Business, Arm. “This collaboration with CoreAVI brings their rich history and expertise in supporting avionics safety rendering and GPU compute use cases into the automotive digital cockpit domain.”

“CoreAVI has a long track record in developing safety critical graphics and compute software in conjunction with the leading products and customers in high-reliability certified applications. We share Arm’s vision that both the automotive and avionics markets will benefit from ensuring safety certification is a leading criterion in design,” said Damian Fozard, CEO at CoreAVI. “We believe that our partnership with Arm will enable integrated platforms that are easy to deploy, have avionics level safety designed-in, and are ideal for the rapidly expanding range of safety critical applications beyond avionics.”

For more information, please contact Sales@coreavi.com.

About Core Avionics & Industrial Inc.
Core Avionics & Industrial Inc. (“CoreAVI”) is a pioneer in the military and aerospace sector with a proven track record in providing entire software and hardware IP platform solutions that enable safety critical applications. A global leader in architecting and supplying real-time and safety critical graphics, compute, and video drivers, “program ready” embedded graphics processors, and DO-254/ED-80 certifiable COTS hardware IP, CoreAVI’s suite of products enables the design and implementation of complete safety critical embedded solutions for aerospace, automotive, and industrial applications that achieve the highest levels of safety certification with long-term support. CoreAVI’s solutions are deployed in commercial and military avionics systems, and support rapidly emerging compute applications in the automotive, industrial, unmanned vehicle, and internet of things markets. CoreAVI’s products may be purchased with certification data kits for the most stringent levels of safety certification, including RTCA DO-254/DO-178C, EUROCAE ED-80/ED-12C and ISO 26262. www.coreavi.com

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