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IEEE 2700™-2014 Specifies Sensor Performance in Consumer Electronics Technologies to Stimulate Innovation for Enabling the Connected Person

PISCATAWAY, N.J., USA, 9 September 2014 – IEEE, the world’s largest professional organization dedicated to advancing technology for humanity, today announced the availability of the IEEE 2700™-2014 “Standard for Sensor Performance Parameter Definitions,” recently approved by the IEEE Standards Association (IEEE-SA) Standards Board. With sensors being one of the primary technologies to help improve the lives of every connected person in the world, IEEE 2700-2014 is intended to provide a common methodology for specifying sensor performance in the ever-expanding sensor technologies in the consumer electronics industry.

IEEE 2700-2014 aims to reinforce innovation in a variety of sensor types for vendors considering ways to integrate two or more sensors—all introduced by Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs), Independent Software Vendors (ISVs) and other platform providers with non-scalable integration challenges.

The IEEE 2700-2014 fulfills the need for a common methodology to define sensor performance, and eases non-scalable integration challenges and burdens across manufacturers. Because sensor framework and technology span not only sensor vendors and ISVs, there are numerous types of sensors that require specification terminology, units, conditions and limits, including: accelerometers, magnetometers, gyrometers/gyroscopes, barometers/pressure sensors, hygrometers/humidity sensors, temperature sensors, ambient light sensors and proximity sensors.

“Ultimately, the goal for the standard is to help chipset manufacturers and OEMs achieve better performance and improved scalability,” said Ken Foust, chair of the IEEE 2700 Working Group. “The industry has been struggling to scale this technology across all platforms, because of the need to accommodate all sensor types from numerous vendors and all of the variations of those sensor types. This new industry standard is intended to reduce costs in working with sensors and help accelerate time to market.”

“The IEEE 2700 standard will be beneficial in the design of future technologies, such as the Internet of Everything that includes the Internet of Things, next generation of the cloud, telemedicine, augmented reality, vehicle-to-vehicle communications and vehicle-to-pedestrian communications,” said Herbert Bennett, chairman of the IEEE Electron Devices Society MEMS Standards Sponsor Committee for the IEEE-SA 2700 Working Group and NIST fellow and executive advisor at the National Institute of Standards and Technology.

The IEEE 2700-2014 resulted from extensive efforts of the IEEE 2700 Standard for Sensor Performance Parameter Definitions Working Group and was developed under the IEEE-SA Corporate Program as an IEEE Entity standard. It is the first standard to come out of the IEEE-SA and MEMS Industry Group(MIG) Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) announced in February 2014.

“The IEEE 2700-2014 standard’s accelerated timeline was in part due to the early-stage development by MIG of an influential MEMS whitepaper. The strong support provided by the IEEE-SA and MIG volunteers and staff resulted in this new global standard,” said Karen Lightman, executive director, MEMS Industry Group. “Today’s rapid-paced technology innovation leaves consumers demanding better, faster and more features on their devices, so collaborating with IEEE-SA corporate working group members on a level playing field and leveraging the benefits of one technology in relation with others across industry lines is good for business and consumer choice.”

IEEE 2700-2014 is available for purchase at the IEEE Standards Store.

For more information on the IEEE 2700 Standard for Sensor Performance Parameter Definitions Working Group, visit http://standards.ieee.org/develop/wg/mems_wg.html.

To learn more about IEEE-SA, visit us on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/ieeesa, follow us on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/ieeesa, connect with us on LinkedIn at http://www.linkedin.com/groups?gid=1791118 or on the Standards Insight Blog at http://www.standardsinsight.com.

About the IEEE Standards Association

The IEEE Standards Association, a globally recognized standards-setting body within IEEE, develops consensus standards through an open process that engages industry and brings together a broad stakeholder community. IEEE standards set specifications and best practices based on current scientific and technological knowledge. The IEEE-SA has a portfolio of over 900 active standards and more than 500 standards under development. For more information visit http://standards.ieee.org/.

About IEEE

IEEE, a large, global technical professional organization, is dedicated to advancing technology for the benefit of humanity. Through its highly cited publications, conferences, technology standards, and professional and educational activities, IEEE is the trusted voice on a wide variety of areas ranging from aerospace systems, computers and telecommunications to biomedical engineering, electric power and consumer electronics. Learn more athttp://www.ieee.org.

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