industry news
Subscribe Now

TI expands its MSP430™ MCU Value Line with 64 devices to give 8-bit developers more options with increased memory and capacitive touch capabilities

DALLAS, TX (January 25, 2011) – Continuing its commitment to provide more low-cost options to 8-bit developers, Texas Instruments Incorporated (TI) (NYSE: TXN) today announced 64 new ultra-low-power MSP430 Value Line microcontrollers (MCUs) that offer 16-bit performance at an 8-bit price. The new MSP430G2xx2 MCUs include integrated capacitive touch IOs, allowing developers to interface directly with capacitive touch pads, eliminating the need for additional hardware and components.  Additionally, the MSP430 MCU Value Line expansion provides extra package and memory options, providing developers with increased design flexibility. Supported by TI’s $4.30 LaunchPad development kit, free software and broad third party support network, the G2xx2 MCUs further enable an easy upgrade to 16-bit performance while maintaining the ultra-low Value Line price. For more information, please visit www.ti.com/430value_phase2-pr-lp.   

Key features and benefits of the Value Line G2xx2 MCUs

  • Integrated capacitive touch IOs eliminate the need for external passive components, reducing system level BOM
  • Increased memory ranges of up to 8KB Flash and 256B RAM to support more advanced  applications
  • Additional package options with increased pin counts (20-pin TSSOP and PDIP) offer more flexibility when programming and designing form factors
  • Optimized efficiency with ultra-low standby power of 0.4 microamps  and <1 microseconds wake-up time as well as integrated intelligent peripherals, such as 10-bit ADCs, UART, comparator and serial communication 
  • Supported by complete hardware and software development environment with free, downloadable software debuggers and compilers, including Code Composer Studio ™ IDE and IAR Embedded Workbench, and $4.30 LaunchPad development kit
  • Code compatible across MSP430 platform providing easy migration path for added scalability

Pricing and availability

The new MSP430G2xx2 MCUs are priced from $0.33 for 100K units and samples are immediately available. The MSP430 MCU Value Line LaunchPad development kit (MSP-EXP430G2) is priced at $4.30 and can be ordered at www.ti.com/430value_phase2-pr-es.    

TI’s broad portfolio of MCUs and software

From general purpose, ultra-low power MSP430 MCUs, to Stellaris® Cortex™-M3-based 32-bit MCUs and high performance, real-time control TMS320C2000™ MCUs, TI offers the broadest range of microcontroller solutions. Designers can accelerate time to market by tapping into TI’s complete software and hardware tools, extensive third-party offerings and technical support.

Find out more about TI’s MSP430 MCU Value Line by visiting the links below:

About Texas Instruments

Texas Instruments (NYSE: TXN) helps customers solve problems and develop new electronics that make the world smarter, healthier, safer, greener and more fun.  A global semiconductor company, TI innovates through design, sales and manufacturing operations in more than 30 countries.  For more information, go to www.ti.com.

Leave a Reply

featured blogs
Oct 13, 2019
In part 3 of this blog series we looked at what typically is the longest stage in designing a PCB Routing and net tuning.  In part 4 we will finish the design process by looking at planes, and some miscellaneous items that may be required in some designs. Planes Figure 8...
Oct 13, 2019
https://youtu.be/8BM28qwHyUk Made at Arm TechCon (camera Randy Smith) Monday: What Is Quantum Supremacy? Tuesday: It's Ada Lovelace Day Today Wednesday: The First Woman to Receive the Kaufman... [[ Click on the title to access the full blog on the Cadence Community site...
Oct 11, 2019
The FPGA (or ACAP) universe gathered at the San Jose Fairmount last week during the Xilinx Developer Forum. Engineers, data scientists, analysts, distributors, alliance partners and more came to learn about the latest hardware, software and system level solutions from Xilinx....
Oct 11, 2019
Have you ever stayed awake at night pondering palindromic digital clock posers?...
Oct 11, 2019
[From the last episode: We looked at subroutines in computer programs.] We saw a couple weeks ago that some memories are big, but slow (flash memory). Others are fast, but not so big '€“ and they'€™re power-hungry to boot (SRAM). This sets up an interesting problem. When ...