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This tiny electric car stretches to take on more passengers

We’ve already seen single-seat electric cars, the tiny size of which makes them ideal for maneuvering through congested urban environments. However, what happens when you want to carry a second passenger? In the case of the iEV X, the car just gets longer.

Currently in functioning prototype form, the German-made iEV (Intelligent Electric Vehicle) X is just 78 cm wide (30.7 inches), and 160 cm long (63 inches) in single-passenger mode. When users want to bring someone else along, the car can be electrically lengthened to 190 cm (74.8 inches), allowing a second seat to be added behind the driver’s. If they want to take on a third passenger (or some extra cargo), it can be further lengthened to 220 cm (86.6 inches).

Read more at NewAtlas.com

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