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Researchers at Northwestern University Develop World’s Smallest Wearable Device

EVANSTON – A Northwestern University professor, working in conjunction with the global beauty company L’Oréal, has developed the smallest wearable device in the world. The wafer-thin, feather-light sensor can fit on a fingernail and precisely measures a person’s exposure to UV light from the sun.

Via Northwestern Now

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