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Printable medication delivers several drugs in one dose

By adapting a technology used to build electronic components, researchers at the University of Michigan have developed a new way to manufacture medication. The technique could eventually allow hospitals, pharmacies and doctor’s offices to print drugs on demand, mixing different medications into one easy-to-administer dose.

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