fresh bytes
Subscribe Now

MIT’s ColorFab can 3D print jewelry that changes colors

3D printing can already turn your amazing ideas into tangible objects, but a new technique out of MIT CSAIL could lead to even better results. The method, called ColorFab, gives you the ability to create objects that can change colors after you print them out. You can use it, for instance, to create a phone case or a pair of earrings that matches your red dress today and will also match your blue pantsuit tomorrow. ColorFab’s magic lies in the CSAIL team’s custom-made ink, which has base dyes and light-adaptable or “photochromic” dyes. The light-adaptable dyes bring out the color in the base dyes when exposed to UV light. Under visible light, the colors disappear, and the ink turns transparent. Continue reading at Engadget

Leave a Reply

featured blogs
Oct 19, 2020
Have you ever wondered if there may another world hidden behind the facade of the one we know and love? If so, would you like to go there for a visit?...
Oct 19, 2020
Sometimes, you attend an event and it feels like you are present at the start of a new era that will change some aspect of the technology industry. Of course, things don't change overnight. One... [[ Click on the title to access the full blog on the Cadence Community si...
Oct 16, 2020
Another event popular in the tech event circuit is PCI-SIG® DevCon. While DevCon events are usually in-person around the globe, this year, like so many others events, PCI-SIG DevCon is going virtual. PCI-SIG DevCons are members-driven events that provide an opportunity to le...
Oct 16, 2020
[From the last episode: We put together many of the ideas we'€™ve been describing to show the basics of how in-memory compute works.] I'€™m going to take a sec for some commentary before we continue with the last few steps of in-memory compute. The whole point of this web...

featured video

Demo: Low-Power Machine Learning Inference with DesignWare ARC EM9D Processor IP

Sponsored by Synopsys

Applications that require sensing on a continuous basis are always on and often battery operated. In this video, the low-power ARC EM9D Processors run a handwriting character recognition neural network graph to infer the letter that is written.

Click here for more information about DesignWare ARC EM9D / EM11D Processors

featured paper

Fundamentals of Precision ADC Noise Analysis

Sponsored by Texas Instruments

Build your knowledge of noise performance with high-resolution delta-sigma ADCs. This e-book covers types of ADC noise, how other components contribute noise to the system, and how these noise sources interact with each other.

Click here to download the whitepaper

Featured Chalk Talk

Keeping Your Linux Device Secure

Sponsored by Mentor

Embedded security is an ongoing process, not a one-time effort. Even after your design is shipped, security vulnerabilities are certain to be discovered - even in things like the operating system. In this episode of Chalk Talk, Amelia Dalton chats with Kathy Tufto from Mentor - a Siemens business, about how to make a plan to keep your Linux-based embedded design secure, and how to respond quickly when new vulnerabilities are discovered.

More information about Mentor Embedded Linux®