fresh bytes
Subscribe Now

Like it or not, Google tracks your movements

Google wants to know where you go so badly that it records your movements even when you explicitly tell it not to.

An Associated Press investigation found that many Google services on Android devices and iPhones store your location data even if you’ve used a privacy setting that says it will prevent Google from doing so.

Computer-science researchers at Princeton confirmed these findings at the AP’s request.

For the most part, Google is upfront about asking permission to use your location information. An app like Google Maps will remind you to allow access to location if you use it for navigating. If you agree to let it record your location over time, Google Maps will display that history for you in a “timeline” that maps out your daily movements.

Read more at TechXplore.com

Leave a Reply

featured blogs
Nov 24, 2021
The need for automatic mesh generation has never been clearer. The CFD Vision 2030 Study called most applied CFD 'onerous' and cited meshing's inability to generate complex meshes on the first... [[ Click on the title to access the full blog on the Cadence Community site. ]]...
Nov 24, 2021
I just saw an amazing video showing Mick Jagger and the Rolling Stones from 2021 mixed with Spot robot dogs from Boston Dynamics....
Nov 23, 2021
We explain clock domain crossing & common challenges faced during the ASIC design flow as chip designers scale up CDC verification for multi-billion-gate ASICs. The post Integration Challenges for Multi-Billion-Gate ASICs: Part 1 – Clock Domain Crossing appeared f...
Nov 8, 2021
Intel® FPGA Technology Day (IFTD) is a free four-day event that will be hosted virtually across the globe in North America, China, Japan, EMEA, and Asia Pacific from December 6-9, 2021. The theme of IFTD 2021 is 'Accelerating a Smart and Connected World.' This virtual event ...

featured paper

Watch PCIe Gen5 Interface Demo Running on a Speedster®7t FPGA from Achronix

Sponsored by Achronix

PCIe Gen5 is the most advanced PCIe specification available today, providing data link capable of a 32 GT/s for next-generation systems. You can start to design your PCIe Gen5 system today using the Achronix Speedster7t FPGA. This demonstration shows a successful PCIe Gen5 link between a Lecroy PCIe exerciser and a Speedster7t FPGA. The Speedster7t family is one of the first FPGAs available now that natively supports the PCIe Gen5 specification.

Contact Achronix for a Demonstration of Speedster7t FPGA

featured paper

Add display or projection anywhere with the smallest DMD available

Sponsored by Texas Instruments

The new 0.16-inch DLP160CP DMD is a good fit for any application that requires an extremely compact projection system to create bright and crisp video or informational images on virtually any surface. Now you can seamlessly design that on-demand projection display into your next-generation Internet of Things appliance, autonomous robot or AR glasses.

Click to read more

featured chalk talk

Complete Packaging for IIoT Devices

Sponsored by Mouser Electronics and Phoenix Contact

Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) design brings a new level of demands to the engineering team, particularly in areas like thermal performance, reliability, and scalability. And, packaging has a key role to play. In this episode of Chalk Talk, Amelia Dalton chats with Joel Boone of Phoenix Contact about challenges and solutions in IIoT design packaging.

Click here for more information about Phoenix Contact ICS 50 Enclosure System