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Humanoid Robot Can Exercise and Perspire

 

A team of Japanese roboticists has built a new “human mimetic humanoid” that anatomically resembles the musculoskeletal intricacy of a human boy. Called Kengoro, the robot demonstrated its human-like abilities by completing a series of exercises including push-ups and sit-ups.

Via NewAtlas

 

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