fresh bytes
Subscribe Now

Google’s AI invents sounds humans have never heard before

Engel and Resnick are part of Google Magenta—a small team of AI researchers inside the internet giant building computer systems that can make their own art—and this is their latest project. It’s called NSynth, and the team will publicly demonstrate the technology later this week at Moogfest, the annual art, music, and technology festival, held this year in Durham, North Carolina.

The idea is that NSynth, which Google first discussed in a blog post last month, will provide musicians with an entirely new range of tools for making music. Critic Marc Weidenbaum points out that the approach isn’t very far removed from what orchestral conductors have done for ages—“the blending of instruments is nothing new,” he says—but he also believes that Google’s technology could push this age-old practice into new places. “Artistically, it could yield some cool stuff, and because it’s Google, people will follow their lead,” he says. 

Continue reading at Wired

Leave a Reply

featured blogs
Sep 20, 2018
Whether the Designer is driving schedule or keeping the Project Manager in the loop, we need to hone the skill of estimating a job accurately and with sufficient wiggle room....
Sep 20, 2018
At this year's HOT CHIPS, Jeff Rupley of Samsung presented the application processor that goes in their Galaxy S9 and S9+ smartphones. Apple only ever gives cursory information about their Ax chips, and I don't remember seeing a lot of detail about the HiSilicon chi...
Sep 18, 2018
Samtec performs several tests in-house as part of our qualification testing on a product series; including Low Level Contact Resistance (LLCR). It measures the amount of resistance in a position on a part. LLCR is used in combination with several other tests to track the over...
Sep 9, 2018
  The lease listing on the Pacific American Group'€™s Web site reads: '€œEight Forty Four East Charleston Road is a historically relevant commercial building in Palo Alto. This building was key in the development of Silicon Valley'€™s computer business. Here, Rober...