fresh bytes
Subscribe Now

Cyborg bacteria covered in solar panels can beat plants at photosynthesis

Cyborg bacteria covered in tiny solar panels can beat plants at photosynthesis, which means they could be key in creating renewable solar fuels.

Photosynthesis, or the way plants turn carbon dioxide into oxygen, is crucial for life on Earth — but it’s not a very efficient process. Scientists at a UC Berkeley lab taught bacteria how to cover their own bodies with nanocrystals, which function as tiny solar panels that capture more energy than plants can. The bacteria ended up having 80 percent efficiency, compared to about 2 percent for plants. This form of artificial photosynthesis is a big step toward developing more efficient fuels that generate renewable energy using sunlight. (The results were presented at the 54th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.)

Continue reading at The Verge

Image: Allison Joyce / Getty Images

Leave a Reply

featured blogs
Nov 30, 2021
Explore the history of the chip design process, from the days of Integrated Device Manufacturers (IDMs) to EDA tools and today's era of democratized design. The post Just What Is Democratized Design Anyway? appeared first on From Silicon To Software....
Nov 30, 2021
The demand for smaller electronics devices can be achieved by high-density layers in multi-layer build-up substrates or multi-layered printed circuit boards (PCB). Vias are essential in the design... [[ Click on the title to access the full blog on the Cadence Community site...
Nov 29, 2021
Tell me if you've heard this before, but I'm looking for a Nordic word that has a sufficiently amorphous gestalt to make it confusing to explain in Norwegian....
Nov 8, 2021
Intel® FPGA Technology Day (IFTD) is a free four-day event that will be hosted virtually across the globe in North America, China, Japan, EMEA, and Asia Pacific from December 6-9, 2021. The theme of IFTD 2021 is 'Accelerating a Smart and Connected World.' This virtual event ...

featured video

Achronix VectorPath Accelerator Card Uses PCIe Gen4 x16 to Communicate with AMD Ryzen PC

Sponsored by Achronix

In this demonstration, the Achronix VectorPath™ accelerator card connects to an AMD Ryzen based PC using PCIe Gen4 x16 interface. The host PC issues commands to have the Speedster™7t FPGA on the VectorPath accelerator card write and read to external GDDR6 memory on the board. These data transactions are performed using the Speedster7t FPGA’s 2D network on chip or NoC which eliminates the need to write complex RTL code to design the host PC to GDDR6 memory interface.

Contact Achronix for a Demonstration of Speedster7t FPGA

featured paper

4 questions to ask before choosing a Wi-SUN stack

Sponsored by Texas Instruments

Scalability, reliability, security, and speed—these are the advantages that the Wireless Smart Ubiquitous Network (Wi-SUN®) offers to smart cities and the Internet of Things. But as a developer, how can you maximize these advantages in your software design? In this article, TI addresses four questions to help you save development cost and get to market faster with a more streamlined design cycle for your IoT application.

Click to read more

featured chalk talk

Tame the SiC Beast - Unleash the Full Capacity of Silicon Carbide

Sponsored by Mouser Electronics and Microchip

Wide band gap materials such as silicon carbide are revolutionizing the power industry. At the same time, they can also introduce byproducts including overheating, short circuits and over voltage. The question remains: how can we use silicon carbide without those headache-inducing side effects? In this episode of Chalk Talk, Amelia Dalton chats with Rob Weber from Microchip about Microchip’s patented augmented switching technology can make those silicon carbide side effects a thing of the past while reducing our switching losses up to 50% and accelerating our time to market as well.

Click here for more information about the Microsemi / Microchip AgileSwitch® ASDAK+ Augmented Switching™ Dev Kit