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Cyborg bacteria covered in solar panels can beat plants at photosynthesis

Cyborg bacteria covered in tiny solar panels can beat plants at photosynthesis, which means they could be key in creating renewable solar fuels.

Photosynthesis, or the way plants turn carbon dioxide into oxygen, is crucial for life on Earth — but it’s not a very efficient process. Scientists at a UC Berkeley lab taught bacteria how to cover their own bodies with nanocrystals, which function as tiny solar panels that capture more energy than plants can. The bacteria ended up having 80 percent efficiency, compared to about 2 percent for plants. This form of artificial photosynthesis is a big step toward developing more efficient fuels that generate renewable energy using sunlight. (The results were presented at the 54th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.)

Continue reading at The Verge

Image: Allison Joyce / Getty Images

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Increase the flexibility of your precision analog designs leveraging a low-cost MSP430™ MCU

Sponsored by Texas Instruments

There are many ways to address performance requirements while reducing the overall cost of your design. People often use dedicated integrated circuits to address specific functions, but this approach can cause variations in cost, complexity, and ease of use. There is another way to unlock the full potential of your design. Read more to see how a programmable MCU provides additional functionality and flexibility that is not typically available with conventional approaches.

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Featured Chalk Talk

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Sponsored by Mentor

Embedded security is an ongoing process, not a one-time effort. Even after your design is shipped, security vulnerabilities are certain to be discovered - even in things like the operating system. In this episode of Chalk Talk, Amelia Dalton chats with Kathy Tufto from Mentor - a Siemens business, about how to make a plan to keep your Linux-based embedded design secure, and how to respond quickly when new vulnerabilities are discovered.

More information about Mentor Embedded Linux®