fresh bytes
Subscribe Now

AI may be able to smell illnesses in human breath

Artificial intelligence (AI) is best known for its ability to see (as in driverless cars) and listen (as in Alexa and other home assistants). From now on, it may also smell. My colleagues and I are developing an AI system that can smell human breath and learn how to identify a range of illness-revealing substances that we might breathe out.

The sense of smell is used by animals and even plants to identify hundreds of different substances that float in the air. But compared to that of other animals, the human sense of smell is far less developed and certainly not used to carry out daily activities. For this reason, humans aren’t particularly aware of the richness of information that can be transmitted through the air, and can be perceived by a highly sensitive olfactory system. AI may be about to change that.

For a few decades, laboratories around the world have been able to use machines to detect very small amounts of substances in the air. Those machines, called gas-chromatography mass-spectrometers or GC-MS, can analyze the air to discover thousands of different molecules known as volatile organic compounds.

Read more at Smithsonianmag.com

Leave a Reply

featured blogs
Dec 3, 2021
Believe it or not, I ran into John (he told me I could call him that) at a small café just a couple of evenings ago as I pen these words....
Dec 3, 2021
The annual Design Automation Conference (DAC) is coming up December 5th to 9th, next week. It is in-person in San Francisco's Moscone Center West. It will be available virtually from December... [[ Click on the title to access the full blog on the Cadence Community site...
Dec 1, 2021
We discuss semiconductor lithography and the importance of women in engineering with Mariya Braylovska, Director of R&D for Custom Design & Manufacturing. The post Q&A with Mariya Braylovska, R&D Director, on the Joy of Solving Technical Challenges with a...
Nov 8, 2021
Intel® FPGA Technology Day (IFTD) is a free four-day event that will be hosted virtually across the globe in North America, China, Japan, EMEA, and Asia Pacific from December 6-9, 2021. The theme of IFTD 2021 is 'Accelerating a Smart and Connected World.' This virtual event ...

featured video

Design Low-Energy Audio/Voice Capability for Hearables, Wearables & Always-On Devices

Sponsored by Cadence Design Systems

Designing an always-on system that needs to conserve battery life? Need to also include hands-free voice control for your users? Watch this video to learn how you can reduce the energy consumption of devices with small batteries and provide a solution for a greener world with the Cadence® Tensilica® HiFi 1 DSP family.

More information about Cadence® Tensilica® HiFi 1 DSP family

featured paper

How TI mmWave radar safety guards can help improve manufacturing productivity

Sponsored by Texas Instruments

The shift toward industry 4.0 has spurred an increase of robots on factory floors, including industrial robots, collaborative robots and more. Because these robots work alongside humans, they must have advanced sensing and functional safety capabilities to recognize potential collisions and minimize risk of injury. This article discusses how TI mmWave-based safety guards can be used by industrial companies to help improve manufacturing productivity without compromising safety.

Click to read more

featured chalk talk

High-Performance Test to 70 GHz

Sponsored by Samtec

Today’s high-speed serial interfaces with PAM4 present serious challenges when it comes to test. Eval boards can end up huge, and signal integrity of the test point system is always a concern. In this episode of Chalk Talk, Amelia Dalton chats with Matthew Burns of Samtec about the Bullseye test point system, which can maintain signal integrity up to 70 GHz with a compact test point footprint.

Click here for more information about Samtec’s Bulls Eye® Test System