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Safety (and Security) First

Embedded Software, TÜV Certification, and 64 bits

In this week’s Fish Fry, we’re taking on safety, security, and the embedded design software in between. Michael May (Express Logic) and I start things off with an in-depth discussion about the ongoing design-in battle between 32 and 64 bit processors and where ThreadX RTOS fits into the embedded ecosystem. Keeping with this week’s embedded software theme, I also chat with Jim McElroy (LDRA) about what we need to do when our designs must adhere to a security-critical standard, why TÜV Certification is so important, and what it’s like to capitan a whale watching boat.

 

 

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Links for February 5, 2016

More information about Express Logic

More information about LDRA

LDRA Extends TÜV Certification of Compliance Tools, Further Solidifying Leadership Role in Safety and Security Markets

New Episode of Chalk Talk: Cadence Tensilica Vision P5

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