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Refocusing Our Embedded Vision

How FPGAs Will Shape the Future of Embedded Vision

In this week’s episode of Fish Fry, Mario Bergeron (Avnet) and I are scanning the horizon to get a closer look at how FPGAs will shape the future of embedded vision. We explore why embedded vision is a killer app for SoC FPGAs and why there won’t be just one embedded vision to rule them all. Also this week, I check out a new 3D-printed material that changes texture on demand.

 

 

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Links for June 19, 2015

More information about the Embedded Vision Summit

Avnet Electronics Marketing Design Expert to Demystify SoC FPGA Development Methodology in Embedded Vision Summit Technical Presentation

New Episode of Chalk Talk: Connecting ZYNQ-7000 All Programmable SoCs with TE Connectivity Interconnect Products

Whitepaper: Locally and Dynamically Controllable Surface Topography Through the Use of Particle-Enhanced Soft Composites

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