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Baby You Can Drive My Car

Connected Cars and Saving the World Through IoT

Hold on tight ladies and gents! This week I’m flying down the IoT Highway, and I’m taking you with me. Our first stop is a little Consumer Electronics Show preview with Rob Valiton from Atmel. Rob and I discuss why low power MCUs will hold the key to the future of automotive innovation and how we can keep those pesky hackers out of our connected cars. Also this week, we look at how IoT Kickstarter campaign Khushi Baby hopes to make the world a much healthier place — bridging the gap between healthcare workers and the communities they serve, one NFC-equipped necklace at a time.


 

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Links for December 12, 2014

More information about Atmel

More information about Atmel Security CryptoAuthentication

More information about Atmel Automotive

Kickstarter Corner – Khushi Baby

More information about Khushi Baby

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