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Portion Control: Prototypes, Processors and Printed Food

Fish Fry - March 4, 2011

In my Fish Fry this week, I dive into the wild world of FPGA prototyping and offer up an elixir that might just solve all of our prototyping problems. I also investigate a unique new trend that brings processors and FPGA fabric together in off-the-shelf embedded systems and check out a new invention that could bring the Star Trek food replicator to life.  Also this week, I announce the winner of last week’s nerdy giveaway and offer up a new one to chew on. 

If you like the idea of this new series, be sure to drop a comment in the box below. I appreciate all of your comments so far, and we will be working to enhance the Fish Fry each week – as long as you’re watching.


 

Watch Previous Fish Frys

Fish Fry Links – March 4, 2011

Synopsys/Xilinx FPGA Prototyping Manual

FPMM Community

Jim Turley’s Article: Xilinx Zynq Zigs, Zags and Zooms

HSI iSuppli iPad 2 Teardown

3D Printed Food

Microchip Explorer16 Development Board

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