editor's blog
Subscribe Now

Bill Godbout Perishes in Northern California’s Camp Fire

 

People of a certain age, who mindfully lived through the early microcomputer revolution during the first half of the 1970s, know about Bill Godbout. He was that guy who sent out crudely photocopied parts catalogs for all kinds of electronic components, sold from a Quonset hut near Oakland airport. Godbout also developed electronic kits (including DMMs and clocks) and boards and supported the budding electronic music industry as well. I received many of his catalogs and recall ordering sixteen precious 2012 1Kbit SRAMs from him for my senior EE project—a logic analyzer.

By 1976, Godbout got into the S-100 board business. His parts and boards business grew into CompuPro, one of the early participants in the nascent S-100 microcomputer industry. He rubbed shoulders with (and sold parts to) notables of that period including Lee Felsenstein (designer of Processor Technology Sol), Adam Osborne (Osborne Computers), George Morrow (Thinker Toys, Morrow Design), and Mark Greenberg (NorthStar Computers). Godbout was both a pioneer of that era and an enabler for many other pioneers.

The Camp Fire, currently raging in northern California, took Bill Godbout on November 8. The fire burned his house and workshop to the ground. He is survived by his wife Karen and daughter Brandi. They have lost everything they own. There is a family-led GoFundMe campaign to support their needs in this difficult time. The campaign has a modest $10,000 goal and it’s a third of the way there after one day. If you participated in the early microcomputer revolution and remember Bill Godbout and Godbout Electronics, consider helping his family out.

Thanks.

 

 

Leave a Reply

featured blogs
Jul 1, 2022
We all look for 100% perfection and want to turn our dreams (expectations) into reality as far as we can. Are you also looking for a magic wand to turn expectation into reality? The story applies to... ...
Jun 30, 2022
Learn how AI-powered cameras and neural network image processing enable everything from smartphone portraits to machine vision and automotive safety features. The post How AI Helps Cameras See More Clearly appeared first on From Silicon To Software....
Jun 28, 2022
Watching this video caused me to wander off into the weeds looking at a weird and wonderful collection of wheeled implementations....

featured video

Synopsys PCIe 6.0 IP TX and RX Successful Interoperability with Keysight

Sponsored by Synopsys

This DesignCon 2022 video features Synopsys PHY IP for PCIe 6.0 showing wide open PAM-4 eyes, good jitter breakdown decomposition on the Keysight oscilloscope, excellent receiver performance, and simulation-to-silicon correlation.

Click here for more information

featured paper

3 key considerations for your next-generation HMI design

Sponsored by Texas Instruments

Human-Machine Interface (HMI) designs are evolving. Learn about three key design considerations for next-generation HMI and find out how low-cost edge AI, power-efficient processing and advanced display capabilities are paving the way for new human-machine interfaces that are smart, easily deployable, and interactive.

Click to read more

featured chalk talk

Medical Grade Temperature Sensing with the World's Smallest Surface Mount FIR Temperature IC

Sponsored by Mouser Electronics and Melexis

Temperature sensing has come a very long way in recent years. In this episode of Chalk Talk, Amelia Dalton chats with Doug Gates from Melexis about the latest innovation in medical grade temperature sensing. They take a closer look at the different kinds of applications that can use this kind of sensing technology, the role that emissivity and field view play in temperature sensing, and what sets the Melexis’ MLX90632 apart from other temperature sending solutions on the market today. 

Click here for more information about Melexis MLX90632 Infrared Temperature Sensors