editor's blog
Subscribe Now

Amazon creates Goldilocks-sized AWS EC2 F1 FPGA instance for cloud computing

AWS (Amazon Web Services) released for general use its FPGA-based EC2 F1 instances in its cloud computing lineup in July, 2017. The EC2 F1 instance is based on Xilinx’s 16nm Virtex UltraScale FPGAs and people have been using this cloud-based hardware acceleration capability to speed up the execution of diverse tasks including the implementation of CNNs (convolutions neural networks), video transcoding, and genome sequencing. I’m certain there’s been some experimentation with high-frequency equity trading as well, but no one’s talking. Not to me, anyway.

Problem was, you could either get one FPGA (the so-called “f1.2xlarge” instance) or eight FPGAs (the “f1.16xlarge” instance. But like Goldilocks, some customers undoubtedly found the f1.2xlarge instance to be “too small” and the f1.16xlarge instance “too big.”

How do I know?

I know because AWS announced a “this one is just right” f1.4xlarge EC2 F1 instance today with two FPGAs.

Details here.

 

Leave a Reply

featured blogs
Apr 19, 2019
As platforms become more electrical, and the safety of flying becomes paramount, the FAA'€™s EWIS regulations serve as a cornerstone to modern aircraft wiring compliance and safety certification. EWIS (rhymes with '€œGee whiz'€) is both a concept and practice that embr...
Apr 19, 2019
Spring is here and we just got done with our first round of the cleaning action at home over the weekend. Yes, it usually takes us a few weekends to get to the "it-looks-great" feeling! In... [[ Click on the title to access the full blog on the Cadence Community si...
Apr 18, 2019
Thermal Shock testing isn’t unique to the connector world, but it does play a big role in the qualification testing that Samtec puts all connectors through before they are released for production. Chances are likely that you thermally shock many items per day and don...
Jan 25, 2019
Let'€™s face it: We'€™re addicted to SRAM. It'€™s big, it'€™s power-hungry, but it'€™s fast. And no matter how much we complain about it, we still use it. Because we don'€™t have anything better in the mainstream yet. We'€™ve looked at attempts to improve conven...