editor's blog
Subscribe Now

Why are the IEEE President and President-Elect speaking in Ft. Collins? Because…

I worked at HP in Ft. Collins, Colorado back in the 1970s. It was a heady experience. We were designing and building early, pre-PC desktop computers and we owned the market back then. The division I worked for eventually migrated to 32-bit workstations, chased from the desktop computer arena by IBM’s PC. Although there were/are some other tech companies in Ft. Collins—and a gigantic Budweiser brewery—it’s not really a tech town although I did take my first (and only) class in operating systems from a CSU (Colorado State University) professor from Ft. Collins, along with most of the engineers writing software for HP in Colorado back then. That’s why I was surprised to learn that the IEEE’s President and CEO James Jeffries and its President-Elect José M. F. Moura will be holding a live town hall, er IEEE President’s Forum, on the evening of September 27 in Ft. Collins.

I was alerted to this event by my longtime friend and former HP colleague Roger Ison, who now lists his vocation as “retired” on LinkedIn. Finding myself suffering from a bout of cognitive dissonance, I had to ask Roger why the IEEE’s President and President-Elect were journeying all the way to a front-range cow town like Ft. Collins for a President’s Forum. He replied simply:

“It’s happening in FoCo because Richard Toftness organized it. He’s involved with a special program he developed (with IEEE) at CSU called Engineer in Residence. Very active in High Plains section. I believe he suggested and organized this event.”

I guess that’s as good an explanation as any.

You do not need to journey to the Colorado front range to attend this event. You can attend virtually and the organizers are encouraging IEEE Sections, Chapters, and Groups to form “Watch Parties” for this event.

More info including registration here.

 

Leave a Reply

featured blogs
Dec 1, 2022
Raspberry Pi are known for providing lost-cost computing around the world. Their computers have been used by schools, small businesses, and even government call centers. One of their missions is to educate children about computers and to help them realize their potential thro...
Nov 30, 2022
By Chris Clark, Senior Manager, Synopsys Automotive Group The post How Software-Defined Vehicles Expand the Automotive Revenue Stream appeared first on From Silicon To Software....
Nov 30, 2022
By Joe Davis Sponsored by France's ElectroniqueS magazine, the Electrons d'Or Award program identifies the most innovative products of the… ...
Nov 18, 2022
This bodacious beauty is better equipped than my car, with 360-degree collision avoidance sensors, party lights, and a backup camera, to name but a few....

featured video

Unique AMS Emulation Technology

Sponsored by Synopsys

Learn about Synopsys' collaboration with DARPA and other partners to develop a one-of-a-kind, high-performance AMS silicon verification capability. Please watch the video interview or read it online.

Read the interview online:

featured paper

How SHP in plastic packaging addresses 3 key space application design challenges

Sponsored by Texas Instruments

TI’s SHP space-qualification level provides higher thermal efficiency, a smaller footprint and increased bandwidth compared to traditional ceramic packaging. The common package and pinout between the industrial- and space-grade versions enable you to get the newest technologies into your space hardware designs as soon as the commercial-grade device is sampling, because all prototyping work on the commercial product translates directly to a drop-in space-qualified SHP product.

Click to read more

featured chalk talk

Current Sense Resistor - WFC & WFCP Series

Sponsored by Mouser Electronics and Vishay

If you are working on a telecom, consumer or industrial design, current sense resistors can give you a great way to detect and convert current to voltage. In this episode of Chalk Talk, Amelia Dalton chats with Clinton Stiffler from Vishay about the what, where and how of Vishay’s WFC and WFCP current sense resistors. They investigate how these current sense resistors are constructed, how the flip-chip design of these current sense resistors reduces TCR compared to other chip resistors, and how you can get started using a Vishay current sense resistor in your next design.

Click here for more information about Vishay / Dale WFC/WFCP Metal Foil Current Sense Resistors